Vitamin D, the Right Stuff

The importance of vitamin D is often overlooked. So much so, that many in the United States are teetering towards vitamin D deficiency—not good! I’ll let Dr. Fuhrman explain:
Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that your body makes after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun. Vitamin D functions as a hormone because it sends a message to the intestines to increase the absorption of calcium and phosphorus. By promoting calcium absorption, vitamin D helps to form and maintain strong bones…


…Because vitamin D increases the absorption of calcium in the gastrointestinal tract and stimulates osteoblastic (bone-building cells) activity, vitamin D has been generating lots of interest lately in the medical literature. Borderline low levels of vitamin D have been found to be very common in the United States and Canada…

…It is estimated that over 25 million adults in the United States have, or are at risk of developing, osteoporosis. Adequate storage levels of vitamin D help keep bones strong and help prevent osteoporosis in older adults. Vitamin D deficiency results in diminished calcium absorption, and has been linked to a higher incidence of osteoporosis-related bone fractures seen in post menopausal women and older Americans…

…It is extremely important for individuals with limited sun exposure to ingest supplemental vitamin D.
So, what kind of supplement should you choose? How about one like this? Check out this study in JAMA, “Fracture Prevention With Vitamin D Supplementation.” Here’s a bit:
Objective: To estimate the effectiveness of vitamin D supplementation in preventing hip and nonvertebral fractures in older persons.


Data Synthesis: All pooled analyses were based on random-effects models. Five RCTs for hip fracture (n = 9294) and 7 RCTs for nonvertebral fracture risk (n = 9820) met our inclusion criteria. All trials used cholecalciferol. Heterogeneity among studies for both hip and nonvertebral fracture prevention was observed, which disappeared after pooling RCTs with low-dose (400 IU/d) and higher-dose vitamin D (700-800 IU/d), separately. A vitamin D dose of 700 to 800 IU/d reduced the relative risk (RR) of hip fracture by 26% (3 RCTs with 5572 persons; pooled RR, 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.61-0.88) and any nonvertebral fracture by 23% (5 RCTs with 6098 persons; pooled RR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.68-0.87) vs calcium or placebo. No significant benefit was observed for RCTs with 400 IU/d vitamin D (2 RCTs with 3722 persons; pooled RR for hip fracture, 1.15; 95% CI, 0.88-1.50; and pooled RR for any nonvertebral fracture, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.86-1.24).

Conclusions: Oral vitamin D supplementation between 700 to 800 IU/d appears to reduce the risk of hip and any nonvertebral fractures in ambulatory or institutionalized elderly persons. An oral vitamin D dose of 400 IU/d is not sufficient for fracture prevention.
Now, where can you find a gentle oral vitamin D supplement that’ll deliver this dosage? What about these? Take a look:

Dr. Fuhrman’s Osteo–Sun (non-vegan)







Dr. Fuhrman’s Osteo–Sun (vegan)





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Comments (1) Read through and enter the discussion with the form at the end
Trevor - May 7, 2008 5:31 PM

People don't realize that vitamins need each other! Calcium needs vitamin D. I like Dr. Furman's vitamins. I always check what I need through the Dietary supplement Information Bureau (better than Wikipedia) to find out which supplements I need.
http://www.dsib.org/vitamin_D

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