Behold...MUSHROOM POWER!

Dr. Fuhrman will tell you, “Mushrooms make a great chewy replacement to meat. Exploring their varieties is a great way to add interesting flavors and texture to dishes.” But, did you know mushrooms are also potent prostate cancer-fighters? More from the AFP:
Researchers at the university in northern Israel said they found molecules in the Ganoderma lucidum mushroom, commonly known as the reishi, which help supress some mechanisms involved in the progression of prostate cancer.


"We already knew the mushroom could impede the development of cancer by affecting the immune system. The in-vitro trials we have done show that it attacks the cancer cells directly," chief researcher Ben Zion Zaidman told AFP.

"These results give rise to hope about developing medication to treat prostate cancer," he said of research carried out to date only in Petri dishes. The research still has to be tested on animals.
Mushrooms are one of my favorite foods! In fact, I’m debating adopting one of those truffle-sniffing dogs—kidding. But seriously, mushrooms are the real deal. Here Dr. Fuhrman explains why they’re especially good in the fight against cancer. Take a look:
Even though they are a fungus, and not a real vegetable, mushrooms contain a variety of powerful phytochemicals and have been linked to decreased risk of chronic diseases, especially cancer.
And for you mushroom-haters out there—you know who you are—eating mushrooms does not have to be an icky experience. Check out these amazing mushroom recipes:
Doubly Delicious Greens
1 large bunch bok choy, chopped
1 large bunch Swiss chard, chopped
1 medium onion, coarsely chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 15-ounce can diced tomatoes (no salt)
2 cups shiitake and/or baby bella mushrooms, sliced
1/2 teaspoon dried Italian herb seasoning
Place bok choy, Swiss chard, onions, and garlic in a large steamer and steam until almost tender, about 10 minutes. In a large pot add tomatoes, mushrooms, steamed greens mixture, and seasoning. Simmer over low heat for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Cabbage Mushroom Soup
15 oz. carrot juice
10 oz. celery juice
20 oz. water
6 onions
1 head green cabbage
3 stalks broccoli rabe
6 leaves collard greens
4 cups mushrooms, chopped (shiitake preferred)
1 Tbsp. nutritional yeast
1 tsp. garlic powder
1 tsp. Salt-Free 17 Seasoning (Lawry’s)
1 tsp. Mrs. Dash
1/4 cup unhulled raw sesame seeds
1/4 cup raw cashews
1/2 cup red kidney beans
1/2 cup white beans
Cook all ingredients (except the sesame seeds and cashews) on a very low flame in a large covered pot. Remove the cabbage, broccoli rabe, and collards when soft and place in a blender or food processor. Ladle in a little of the soup liquid, purée, and pour the entire mixture back into the soup. Next, put the sesame seeds and cashews into the blender, ladle in some of the soup, purée until silky smooth, and pour the mixture into the soup. Continue cooking until the beans are soft, for about 2 hours. (The basic recipe can be made with any types of greens and beans.)
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Comments (3) Read through and enter the discussion with the form at the end
Carol - December 20, 2007 12:17 PM

I also love mushrooms and eat them a lot, but I just read the other day that the strain that grows white button and portabello mushrooms has something in it that may cause liver cancer. Here's the link to what I found:

http://www.practicallyedible.com/edible.nsf/encyclopaedia!openframeset&frame=Right&Src=/edible.nsf/list/Agaricus+Mushrooms!opendocument&keyword=Agaricus+Mushrooms

I'm still eating mushrooms but now I'm confused!

LLouise - December 20, 2007 12:37 PM

Oh, no! Say it ain't so :( Carol, I don't even want to read that link! I eat mushies every day...
I've read a lot of pros and cons about mushies, though, and decided to eat them. I really don't know what are the concrete facts on this, but, I've never heard of anyone dying from eating (non-poisonous) mushrooms or from a mushroom-related disease ??

That mushroom Cabbage soup looks yum! I have not tried LAWRY'S no-salt seasoning and I'm curious now. I'll have to check out the label next shopping venture.

Brigid - February 8, 2011 8:59 AM

Just a little over a year ago I was introduced to Ganoderma by my friend. This mushroom is nicknamed "The King of Herbs". Many reishi mushrooms that are grown in the US are grown in bags. The problem with that is they don't develop spores; a very potent portion of the mushroom. Organo Gold brand comes from the mountains of China and is certified 100% organic.

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