Sensible boundaries keep us safe

 

For many of us who are former, chronic dieters, restrictive eating may have been a very negative experience. We may have had the euphoric high of shedding a few pounds with artificially sweetened desserts and beverages, processed meal replacements, protein powder drinks, or meticulous counting, measuring and recording rituals; but then ate everything in sight afterwards to make up for the inhumane deprivation of vital nutrients that our bodies so desperately needed for survival. 

We may have lost 10 lbs, but then binged and gained 40.   

However, when we liberally and generously flood our bodies with micronutrients, phytochemicals and rich antioxidants, it turns off the biological necessity for craving addictive, unhealthy foods and overeating. For many, it takes at least 3-6 weeks of total abstinence; replacing standard America diet foods with high-nutrient foods for the taste buds to change and to cross over to that threshold of freedom.   

Eat to Live definitely scores as the only proven program out there that eradicates addictive biological cravings, which removes the strong power-struggle with food.

However, one can’t deny the fact that it is not an all-you-can-eat, no restraints way of eating either.  There are guidelines to follow like eating only when truly hungry and stopping before full.

For those of us who have developed unhealthy habits over the years such as: using food to stuff negative emotions, or to celebrate happy occasions, or to eat according to the clock, or as a recreational hobby, or to socialize with others, there’s an intentional and ongoing diligence that has to be maintained for life

Like all addictions, one can never return to destructive habits, no matter how much the cravings for unhealthy foods have ceased. 

For me personally, I can never eat at the computer while skimming Facebook or the news. For me, food turns into a recreational hobby when I do that and I no longer focus on stopping before full. 

Just like many recovering alcoholics can no longer hang out at bars lest they revert back to unhealthy patterns, I can’t mix food with leisure activities that trigger mindless overeating.  Eating is only to nourish my body. Nothing more. It’s no longer a recreational hobby. 

So for that reason, optimal health requires sensible boundaries to safeguard oneself from past engrained habits, depending upon one’s former lifestyle.   

                                 

Eat to live.  We nourish our bodies with high-nutrient foods; eating only when truly hungry and stopping before full. 

 

Simple. Sensible. Effective. Permanent. 

 

 

 

image credit:  vegetables, flickr by Martin Cathrae   

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Comments (7) Read through and enter the discussion with the form at the end
Lynn Pinner - February 7, 2012 9:59 AM

Hello Dr. Fuhrman's

Thank you for all your information. I am writing a Book as
a twelve year Breast Cancer Survivior. I expressed on how
your Book is the perfect tool to become proactive to avoid some of our unecessary challenges. I am personally making a daily effort to make the new transition of a new way to live.

I will always continue to share this Book (Eat to Live) for everyone across the world.
Blessings,
Lynn Pinner

Jenny - February 7, 2012 6:52 PM

It is truly an addiction, and one that seems not as serious as others, but it is! Are sugar and processed food the main culprits that keep the addiction going?

Bill - February 7, 2012 8:16 PM

This is the heart of Eat To Live! And so true, my addictions are under control because of the nutrients being fed into my body. This is the best advice and very sustainable for the rest of my life. Hopefully your life too.

Annette Chambers - February 7, 2012 10:58 PM

Thanks for the comment about what you can never do...mindless eating. I have found this to be really true. I have to sit down and eat a meal on a plate...because I use to eat while doing other things...Once I sit down and eat a great ETL menu, then I quit eating and do other things... Thanks for the great reminder!

David - February 9, 2012 5:47 PM

I think this falls outside the sensible boundaries. I can't believe what they put in this stuff and I can't believe that I used to eat fast food.

http://www.wtop.com/?nid=41&sid=2740519
As for its nutrition rundown, a 24-ounce shake includes 1,081 calories, 37 grams of saturated fat, 3 grams of trans fat and 108 grams of sugar

Alli Dunn - February 24, 2012 12:05 PM

Hello Dr. Fuhrman,

I have struggled with my weight since childhood. Before beginning high school I turned to weight watchers and lost over 50lbs. Unfortunately I got tired of the endless counting and tracking and eventually put almost all my weight back on during college. I found your book on audible.com and was surprised at how well your information made sense. I grew up on a ranch and never thought I would be able to give up animal products. I'm still on the six week plan but have followed it exactly and lost an entire 8.2lbs just in my first week. The best part is that even during the first week I didn't crave sweets, dairy, or meat like I always had with other weight loss plans. After eating I always fell full and satisfied now. I can eat all the veggies and fruits I want without overeating. I believe that the quick results are a great help to keep people motivated to stick to the plan for the entire six weeks and then for life. Thank you so much for writing your book and trying to make people more aware about true nutrion!!! I'm confident that I will reach my goal weight before the summer, keep the weight off, and most importantly become a truely healthy person. My results have inspired my parents and husband. I will your recommend your book (Eat to Live) to all my friends and family!!!

Em - March 31, 2012 5:53 AM

I believe sugar is the main culprit, be it healthy or not. People with true addiction will have trouble controlling even the amount of healthy food they eat. (I've cut out junk for years now, but still overeat on sweet fruits, nuts and nut butters) It's not like I'm missing out on important nutrients, I eat a very wide variety of vegetables every day, yet when it comes to things like bananas or nuts (especially cashews), I simply can't stop myself. Why is that?

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