Disease Proof

Meat-Sweet Bad for Breast Cancer

I like the term “meat-sweet.” Researchers are using it to describe the Western or standard American diet. A new study has determined a diet rich in red-meat, starches, and sweets significantly increases a woman’s chance of developing breast cancer. Robert Preidt of HealthDay News reports:
In the study, American and Chinese researchers studied women, ages 25 to 64, in Shanghai who were newly diagnosed with breast cancer between August 1996 and March 1998.


The dietary habits of the women with the 1,602 breast cancer cases were compared to those of more than 1,500 women without breast cancer.

The researchers found that overweight, postmenopausal women who ate a western-style diet had a greater than twofold increased risk of estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancers. There was no association between breast cancer risk and a vegetable-soy-fish diet.

The "meat-sweet" western diet relies on various kinds of meats, saltwater fish and shellfish, bread, milk, dessert and candy. The vegetable-soy-fish diet favors various vegetables, soy-based products, and freshwater fish.
I know, not exactly earth shattering news. In Eat to Live Dr. Fuhrman makes it clear. The correlation between meat and disease is profound. Take a look:
There is a relationship between animal protein and heart disease. For example, plasma apolioprotein B is positively associated with animal-protein intake and inversely associated (lowered) with vegetable-protein intake (e.g., legumes and greens). Apolioprotein B levels correlate strongly with coronary heart disease1…


…The consumption of chicken and fish is also linked to colon cancer. A large recent study examined the eating habits of 32,000 adults for six years and then watched the incidence of cancer for these subjects over the next six years. Those who avoided red meat but at white meat regularly had a more than 300 percent increase in colon cancer incidence.2
And as for sugar, well, let’s just say its bad news too. More from Dr. Fuhrman and Eat to Live:
Refined sugars include table sugar (sucrose), milk sugar (lactose), honey, brown sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, molasses, corn sweeteners, and fruit juice concentrates. Even the bottled and boxed fruit juices that many children drink are poor food; with no significant nutrient density, they lead to obesity and disease.3
All this makes me wonder, how the heck could anyone eat something like this? It’s Baseball’s Worst Burger!


1. Campbell, T.C., B. Parpia, and J. Chen. 1990. A plant-enriched diet and long-term health, particularly in reference to China. Hort. Science 25 (12): 1512-14.

2. Singh, P.N., and G.E. Fraser. 1998. Dietary risk factors for colon cancer in a low-risk population. Am. J. Epidem. 148: 761-74.

1. Berenson, G. S., S. R. Srinivasan, W. Bao, et al. 1998. Association between multiple cardiovascular risk factors and atherosclerosis in children and young adults. N. Eng. J. Med. 338: 1650-56.
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