Disease Proof

Veggies and Vision

We all know how Dr. Fuhrman feels about nutrition. In a nutshell, the food you eat—or don’t eat—directly affects your health and longevity. Too bad a lot of doctors don’t put two and two together. From Eat to Live:
Patients are told that food has nothing to do with the disease they develop. Dermatologists insist that food has nothing to do with acne, rheumatologists insist that food has nothing to do with rheumatoid arthritis, and gastroenterologists insist that food has nothing to do with irritable and inflammatory bowel disease. Even cardiologists have been resistant to accept the accumulating evidence that atherosclerosis is entirely avoidable. Most of them still believe that coronary artery disease and angina require the invasive treatment of surgery and are not reversible with nutritional intervention. Most physicians have no experience in treating disease naturally with nutritional excellence, and some physicians who don’t know about it are convinced it is not possible.
That’s why news like this is so great. We all worry about getting old and deteriorating physically, but could the right diet help us avoid breaking down like an old jalopy? Maybe so, HealthDay News reports veggies might ward off age-related vision woes. Robert Preidt explains:
People who consume high levels of the yellow plant pigments lutein and zeaxanthin may have a reduced risk of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of irreversible blindness among the elderly.


The Age-Related Eye Disease Study Research Group study, supported by the U.S. government, looked at more than 4,500 people who were between the ages of 60 and 80 when they were enrolled between 1992 and 1998.

Those who consumed the highest levels of lutein and zeaxanthin -- found in yellow and dark leafy vegetables -- were significantly less likely than those who ate the lowest levels of these nutrients to have advanced AMD, the research team found.
Just like the article says, leafy greens do offer up a lot of lutein. But don’t take my word for it! Dr. Fuhrman considers cruciferous vegetables to be among the world’s healthiest foods. For more on that, check out Cruciferous Vegetables. Here’s a bit:
As researchers have looked more deeply into nutritional science, it has become widely known that eating a whole-food, plant-based diet is a far better way to get your nutrients than fiddling around with supplements of various individual nutrients. And the very best way to get the benefits of this superior nutrition is to harness the power of high-nutrient super foods. Not all vegetables are created equal, and one of the most fascinating areas of research in the last 10 years has been the therapeutic value of cruciferous vegetables. Cruciferous vegetables are those in the broccoli and cabbage family and include such foods as bok choy, radishes, and watercress…


…Most of the phytonutrients we hear about (vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, lutein, and lycopene) function as antioxidants in your body, meaning that they neutralize free radicals, rendering them harmless. The phytochemicals in cruciferous vegetables do this and more; they also activate your body’s own built-in antioxidant control system.
And as for vegetables and vision, take a look at these posts. They’ll help you see the light—corny, I know—read them anyway. Enjoy:
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