Disease Proof

Outbreaks Aside, U.S. Eating More Greens

No doubt, the E. coli outbreak scared the heck out of people, but apparently not THAT much. Because according to this report Americans are actually eating more green vegetables. Maggie Fox of Reuters explains:
An increase in the number of foodborne illnesses caused by contaminated spinach or lettuce over the past 35 years cannot be explained by increases in salad consumption over the same period, U.S. government researchers said on Monday.


They said the findings reinforce the need for local, state and federal health authorities to monitor preparation of leafy green vegetables from the point of harvest all the way through the food preparation process…

…U.S. leafy green consumption rose 17 percent during 1986-1995 compared with the previous decade, but outbreaks of foodborne disease caused by leafy greens increased by 60 percent in that period.

In the 1996-2005 time frame, leafy green consumption rose 9 percent over the prior decade, but foodborne diseases outbreaks increased by 39 percent.
Hey, you got to love news like this. Especially since green veggies are nutritional superstars. Did you know leafy greens sock it to cancer? Dr. Fuhrman explains:
Green vegetables have demonstrated the most dramatic protection against cancer. Cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, kale, bok choy, collards, arugala, watercress, and cabbage) contain a symphony of phytonutrients with potent anti-cancer effects.
Just feast your eyes on all these nutrients:


So, why not give these salads a try, a delicious way to get your dose of phytonutrients. Check them out:
Very Veggie Salad
15 ounces or 10 cups mixed greens or baby salad greens
1/2 cup halved cherry tomatoes
1 avocado, cubed
1/4 cup chopped green onions
1 red bell pepper, thinly sliced
left over steamed vegetables (optional)
1/2 15-ounce can lentils, drained, or 1 cups cooked lentils
2 medium carrots, grated
1/4 cup raw sunflower seeds
1/2 cup dressing of choice
Distribute greens, vegetables (except carrots), and lentils on dinner plates. Then distribute grated carrots. Sprinkle with sunflower seeds and pour dressing over salads. Serves 2.

Spinach-Strawberry Salad
3 ounces romaine lettuce
5 ounces organic baby spinach
12 ounces frozen strawberries, thawed, reserving juice
Pile the lettuce and spinach leaves on a plate and lay the defrosted strawberries on top. Pour the juice from the thawed strawberries over the greens. Serves 2.
But, be sure not to sabotage these salads with oily dressings. Not a good idea! More from Dr. Fuhrman:
I know you were told that olive oil is health food. It is not. Keep in mind, oil is processed food, it is not a natural whole food. Oils, even if they are monounsaturated, should not be health food because they are low in nutrients and contain 120 calories per tablespoon, promoting weight gain.


Sure, olive oil and almond oil are improvements over animal fats and margarine, but they still are a contributor to our overweight modern world. Overweight Americans consume and average of three tablespoons of oil in their daily diet, adding and extra 360 calories to their food each day. You need to reach a thinner, ideal weight to achieve maximum protection against heart disease and to reverse heart disease. Use oil, even olive oil sparingly or not at all; certainly, do not have more than one teaspoon per day.
Try these salad dressings instead:
Orange Cashew Dressing
2 peeled navel oranges
1/4 cup orange juice
1/4 cup raw cashews
2 tbsp. of blood orange vinegar or pear vinegar
Blend ingredients until silkly smooth. Use liberally on salad or as vegetable dip. Serves 4-6.

Pistachio Mustard Salad Dressing
1/3 cup raw shelled pistachio nuts
1 tbsp. dijon mustard
2 tbsp. Vegi-Zest or low salt vegetable seasoning
1/4 tsp. garlic powder
1/2 cup unsweetened soy milk
Blend all ingredients until smooth in a high powered blender. Serves 4-6.
Now, if these don’t strike your fancy—or you’re just feeling lazy—why not pay one of these Eating to Live on the Outside favorites a visit:
Personally, I go through more Romaine lettuce and spinach then any rabbit I know!
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