Green-News: Wednesday 7.1.09

  • Would you pay $175 a year to fight global warming? I think I would. That’s what experts say new climate change legislation will cost the average household each year. The $175 comes from the increased cost of doing business and higher sticker price for consumer products—like cars and refrigerators—but many households can expect rebates; via The Daily Green.

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Green-News: Wednesday 6.10.09

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Green-News: Wednesday 4.29.09

  • However, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton says the U.S. should lead the negotiations toward a global treaty on climate change. Meeting with other countries, accounting for 75% of emissions, Clinton insists there is no longer any questions that growing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide are warming the planet, which can propose economic, health and security challenges; The New York Times reports.
  • Speaking of public health, greenhouse gases contain harmful compounds like methane, nitrous oxide, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons and sulfur hexafluoride that threaten human health. Additionally, higher temperatures can cause droughts, floods, wildfires, rising sea level and disruptions of agriculture; from Fresh Greens.

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Green-News: Tuesday 12.30.08

  • Plastic bottles and bisphenol-A (BPA) are in the news a lot lately. And recently, despite consumer outrage, the FDA said BPA is safe as it’s currently used, like in food packaging, but now the agency has agreed to reexamine the research on BPA’s health risks; The New York Times reports.
  • Last week, a small town in Tennessee was flooded by a billion gallons of water and coal ash, when a retention pond for a local coal-burning plant burst! Homes were destroyed, but the long term effects could be worse. Officials fear toxins from the slurry could ruin drinking water; via the Associated Press.

Green-News: Thursday 12.18.08

  • This year the Vatican will recycle its Christmas tree. At 33 meters, it’s the tallest tree ever displayed in St. Peter's Square in Rome. And instead of just chucking it into the wood chipper, the Vatican will use the wood from 120-year-old tree to make toys for poor children; Reuters reports.
  • The U.S. is now growing a lot of maize for biofuels. But experts insist the lack of crop-diversity is messing with bug populations. Meaning there are less insects to eat pests that harm crops. Maize fields attract fewer ladybugs to eat the aphids that damage soybeans; NewScientist explains.
  • We all assume temperatures are constantly on the rise, but according to a new report, 2008 was actually the 10th warmest year since 1850. But, without humans mucking up the climate we would have been 50% less likely to see a year as warm as 2008; The New York Times investigates.
  • Despite their bad reputation, Cuba is a leader in the “eat local” movement. When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, Cuba planted thousands of local gardens to make up for the lack of imported food, setting up urban gardens next to parking lots and even on city rooftops; via ENN.

Green-News: Wednesday 11.26.08