U.S. Food Spending Drops Sharply

Last year, more and more people opened their wallets only to find cobwebs where money used to be, as a result consumer spending on food dropped in 2008, hurting restaurants, brand names and grocery stores. Food spending fell an inflation-adjusted 3.7%, the steepest decline in the 62 years the government has recorded the figure. People’s preferences changed too, for the better and the not-so-better, buying of fresh vegetables jumped 2.3% and beef and sweets decreased 3.4% and 5.1% respectively, but eggs increased 3% and milk 1%; The Wall Street Journal reports.

But the recession-diet news is conflicted. Previous reports claim pasta consumption is up in the United States, because it’s a cheap food that can feed a whole family, despite being incredibly nutrient poor. And others suggest more Americans are turning to processed cereals and ditching veggies to save money.

No doubt, buying food can be very expensive. So try shopping at a farmers market or buying marked down fruits and veggies. Both will help keep money in your wallet.

Via TreeHugger.

Image credit: Bravo213

Times are Tough, So Eat Pasta?

We all know the economy is bad right now. People are pinching pennies. And that’s why, despite the obvious recession, pasta-makers are experiencing growth. Apparently, total pasta consumption in the United States rose by 0.4% per volume and this doesn’t even include sales by mega-retailer Wal-Mart. Shoppers are buying more pasta because it’s cheap; the Associated Press explains.

No doubt, junk food producers love to hear this! Some companies have already started pushing unhealthy cheap food. Because previous reports indicate during a time of recession people are more likely to ditch healthy foods, such as fruits and vegetables, in favor of inexpensive stuff, like cereal and candy.

Okay, it’s not impossible to eat healthfully in these tough times. Just keep your eyes open. For example, every week I find all sorts of reduced price fruits and veggies. Hey, every little bit helps!

Via Fit Sugar.

Image credit: urtica