Cold Weather Gardening - Grow Spinach, Kale, Mustard Greens...

 

It’s August, so fall is right around the corner and most of us think that’s the end of gardening and enjoying fresh homegrown vegetables—wrong! In this video, one organic farmer insists fall is the perfect time to grow Dr. Fuhrman’s favorite, leafy green vegetables, like kale, arugula, mustard greens and lettuce. Apparently, many of these veggies do better in the. Dr. Fuhrman says green—or cruciferous—vegetables are king, loaded with important phytochemicals and nutrients.

Dr. Fuhrman calls green vegetables your best defense against cancer, helping to prevent damage to DNA caused by inferior diet. Recent reports have linked cruciferous vegetables to lower risk of pancreatic and ovarian cancer. Dr. Fuhrman also points out leafy greens are full of fiber, so eating them fills your stomach and leaves you feeling full, without overeating, i.e. you can eat more and still lose weight.

Animal Fat Increases Risk of Pancreatic Cancer

Published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, a new study claims high intake of saturated fat—specifically red meat and dairy—results in a 36% higher risk of pancreatic cancer, compared to people with lower consumption. And a high in take of total fat lead to a 53% increased risk of pancreatic cancer in men and 23% higher risk in women. Scientists examined data on 500,000 individuals, in which 1,337 were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer; Food Navigator reports.

Meat, i.e. saturated fat, is risky and research paints a grim picture. Previous studies have linked meat with higher risk of heart disease, age-related vision loss and various cancers. Fortunately, foods like fruits and vegetables lower the risk of developing cancer and cardiovascular disease.

In related news, experts found people who regularly eat charred or barbecued meat have a 60% higher risk of pancreatic cancer. Burned meat builds up of cancer-causing heterocyclic amines.

Image credit: wickenden

Obesity in Early Adulthood Linked to Pancreatic Cancer

Yeah, don’t get fat. New findings in the Journal of the American Medical Association show having a high body mass index in early adulthood may raise the risk of pancreatic cancer. The study involved 841 pancreatic cancer patients and 752 cancer-free people, with participants asked to recall their height and weight at ages 14 to 19 and in their 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s and 70s. Data found individuals who were overweight at 14 to 19 and in their 30s had a 60% higher risk of pancreatic cancer, but risk seemed to level off after age 40; ScienceDaily explains.

You can keep that risk down with diet. A previous report found eating green veggies like broccoli, cabbage and Brussels sprouts helps fight pancreatic cancer. While charred or barbequed meat raises the risk of pancreatic cancer, due to cancer-causing heterocyclic amines.

In related news, obesity heightens women’s risk of pancreatic cancer. In some cases, as high as 70%, which worries researchers because obesity is largely a preventable problem.

Image credit: kreg.steppe

Charred Meat Raises Pancreatic Cancer Risk

Bad news for that greasy steak! Discussed at the 2009 Meeting of the American Association of Cancer Research, individuals who regularly eat burned or barbecued red meat may have a 60% higher risk of pancreatic cancer. Charred meat contains cancer-causers like heterocyclic amines. For the study, researchers closely monitored the diet of 62,000 healthy people. Over nine years 208 participants were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. The participants eating foods like hamburgers were far more likely to develop cancer. And very well-done meat came with a 70% higher cancer risk; Reuters reports.

Barbecued meat is a nightmare. Last year, a study showed diets loaded with red meat increase risk of colon cancer. Grilled chicken is no better. In January, the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine warned against grilled chicken, due to PhIP, another known carcinogen. And fake charring food is horrible too. Smoke flavorings are now being linked with liver and kidney problems.

But some folks don’t take a hint. The ballpark for the Gateway Grizzlies, a minor league baseball team in Illinois, sells a grilled burger topped with bacon and cheese served in a glazed doughnut. Eek!

Image credit: Another Pint Please...

Health-Points: Friday 3.20.09

  • I guess I’m going to die soon, because I’m a big dummy! New findings in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine reveals an association between higher IQ and decreased mortality, i.e. death, in men. Researchers believe people with higher IQ test scores are less likely to engage in unhealthy behaviors such as smoking and drinking alcohol and more likely to eat better and exercise; ScienceDaily reports.

Image credit: Listal.com: I.Q.

Better Diet, More Exercise Could Cut World Cancer

In 2007, 7.6 million people died from cancer worldwide, but a new study by World Cancer Research Fund and the American Institute for Cancer Research reveals better diets, more exercise and controlling weight is enough to stifle global cancer rates. Calling cancer “mostly preventable” researchers found 43% of colon and 42% of breast cancer in the U.K., 45% of bowel and 38% of breast cancer in the U.S., and other cancers, like prostate and pancreas, could be avoided with healthier lifestyles and diets consisting of more fruits and vegetables and less meat and dairy; Reuters reports

No real shocker here. Foods high in saturated fat, i.e. meat and dairy, are constantly being linked to cancer, like adenocarcinomas and carcinoid tumors in the small intestine, disease progression after prostate cancer surgery, and dioxin, a toxic compound found butter and cheese, is a prominent risk-factor for cancer. So don’t be like this dope and ignore everything and only eat bacon for a month!

Now, flip the script for a second, fruits and vegetables have the opposite effect on cancer. Recently, research determined sulforaphane, a chemical found in green veggies like broccoli, induces enzymes that protect against cancer and eating 28 servings of vegetables a week can cut the risk of prostate cancer by 33%. And fruits, like pomegranates, are packed with cancer-fighting antioxidants.

Image credit: sjdunphy