Dr. Fuhrman discusses nutritional research with Dr. Dean Ornish

 by Jerry Deutsch
Executive Director,Nutritional Research Foundation

 

A meeting of two of the most respected leaders in the field of nutrition and nutritional research took place last week when Dr. Fuhrman and Dr. Ornish met in California. 

Dr. Ornish and Dr. Fuhrman

 

As the Executive Director of the Nutritional Research Foundation I was very fortunate to attend this meeting and now write about it.  

As there are not many physicians and clinical nutrition researchers with their common interests and expertise, Dr. Fuhrman and Dr. Ornish had been communicating by phone and email.  It is hard to believe that it has taken this long for them to meet in person and become friends.  Last week Dr. Fuhrman visited Dr. Ornish’ s research facility in Sausalito,  California and discussed mutual research interests, and areas of agreement and those nutritional issues still in question.  Dr. Fuhrman presented and explained some new findings and research in this field as well as his vast clinical experience over 20 years and his findings. 

Dr. Ornish was enthusiastic about his own new areas of research and shared interesting findings in his ongoing and upcoming studies about cancer prevention and reversal, brain messaging and longevity that he is working on.  It was fascinating, promising and important work.  Dr. Fuhrman’s eyes lit up as he listened intently. Dr. Fuhrman shared his findings on nutritional density, fatty acids, the aging brain and maximizing disease reversal in various conditions and individuals with varying metabolic tendencies.  

They also talked about their families, personal interests and prior shared experiences; the good and the bad.  The time flew by and soon Dr. Fuhrman and I had to leave for some other meetings.  But before we left they both expressed a very strong desire to meet again soon.

Dr. Fuhrman and I then headed out to meet with other leading nutritional researchers in the Bay Area, including at CHORI (Children’s Hospital of Oakland Research Institute) and the BUCK institute. Dr. Fuhrman lectured, presented his findings to the scientists at CHORI and we had private meetings with many scientists doing cutting edge research in the health and nutrition fields.  We discussed a potential ground-breaking joint research project with Dr. Brian Kennedy (CEO of the Buck institute) and had more exciting and productive meetings with some of the country’s top scientists there.  What a great week of fun, sharing, learning and collaborating.  I must also say ‘thank you’ to Howard and Ellen Weiss for arranging these meetings.

The Nutritional Research Foundation is committed to supporting and funding research in the effects of a high nutrient dense style of eating.   We are currently raising funds for a Dr. Fuhrman inspired Breast Cancer Prevention Study.  Information about this and other studies is available at NutritionalResearch.org

 

 

 

Low-Fat Diets Heart Healthier After Weight-Loss

New findings in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association reveal diets low in saturated fat are healthier and help keep LDL, or “bad cholesterol”, in check after someone loses weight. For the study, experts assigned 26 healthy, non-obese diets to one diet, Atkins, South Beach or Ornish, for one month apiece, with the intent of studying biological effects of each diet, specifically cholesterol, blood vessel function and inflammation. Data concluded high-fat diets, like Atkins, raised LDL, but the low-fat, vegetarian Ornish style had the best affect on blood vessel function; Reuters reports.

A low-fat diet, i.e. eating less animal foods and more fruits and veggies, has been proven to not only prevent heart trouble, but reserve it. And just last week, scientists found pomegranates help fight cell inflammation that can lead to heart disease. Also, a previous report observed fad diets, such as high-protein low-carbohydrate, don’t hold up overtime, with dieters gaining back weight after only six months.

High-fat diets, like Atkins, are dangerous. A recent study showed participants eating an Atkins diet plan, consuming 50% saturated fat, performed the worst on blood vessel testing.

Image credit: Andrew Hux