GOMBBS: Greens, Onions, Mushrooms, Berries, Beans, and Seeds

GOMBBS” is an acronym you can use to remember the most nutrient-dense, health-promoting foods on the planet.   These are the foods you should eat every day, and they should make up a significant proportion of your diet – these foods are extremely effective at preventing chronic disease and promoting health and longevity.

G – Greens

Greens Flickr: thebittenword.com

Raw leafy greens contain only about 100 calories per pound, and are packed with nutrients. Leafy greens contain substances that protect blood vessels, and are associated with reduced risk of diabetes.Greens are an excellent tool for weight loss, since they can be consumed in virtually unlimited quantities. Leafy greens are also the most nutrient-dense of all foods, but unfortunately are only consumed in miniscule amounts in a typical American diet. We should follow the example of our closest living relatives – chimpanzees and gorillas – who consume tens of pounds of green leaves every day. The majority of calories in green vegetables, including leafy greens, come from protein, and this plant protein is packaged with beneficial phytochemicals: Green vegetables are rich in folate (the natural form of folic acid), calcium, and contain small amounts of omega-3 fatty acids.  Leafy greens are also rich in antioxidant pigments called carotenoids, specifically lutein and zeaxanthin, which are the carotenoids known to promote healthy vision.2 Also, several leafy greens and other green vegetables (such as bok choy, broccoli, and kale) belong to the cruciferous family of vegetables.

All vegetables contain protective micronutrients and phytochemicals, but cruciferous vegetables have a unique chemical composition; they contain glucosinolates, and when their cell walls are broken by blending, chopping, or chewing, a chemical reaction converts glucosinolates to isothiocyanates (ITCs) - compounds with a variety of potent anti-cancer effects. Because different ITCs can work in different locations in the cell and on different molecules, they can have combined additive effects, working synergistically to remove carcinogens, reduce inflammation, neutralize oxidative stress, inhibit angiogenesis (the process by which tumors acquire a blood supply), and kill cancer cells.3

O – Onions

Onions, along with leeks, garlic, shallots, and scallions, make up the Allium family of vegetables, which have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular and immune systems, as well as anti-diabetic and anti-cancer effects. Allium vegetables are known for their characteristic organosulfur compounds, Similar to the ITCs in cruciferous vegetables, organosulfur compounds are released when onions are chopped, crushed, or chewed. Epidemiological studies have found that increased consumption of Allium vegetables is associated with lower risk of gastric and prostate cancers.    These compounds prevent the development of cancers by detoxifying carcinogens, halting cancer cell growth, and blocking angiogenesis.4 Onions also contain high concentrations of health-promoting flavonoid antioxidants, predominantly quercetin, and red onions also contain at least 25 different anthocyanins.5,6 Quercetin slows tumor development, suppresses growth and proliferation and induces cell death in colon cancer cells.7 Flavonoids also have anti-inflammatory effects that may contribute to cancer prevention.8

 

M - Mushrooms

 

Mushroom. Flickr: Steve Hopson

Consuming mushrooms regularly is associated with decreased risk of breast, stomach, and colorectal cancers.  In one recent Chinese study, women who ate at least 10 grams of fresh mushrooms each day (about one mushroom per day) had a 64% decreased risk of breast cancer. Even more dramatic protection was gained by women who ate 10 grams of mushrooms and drank green tea daily - an 89% decrease in risk for premenopausal women, and 82% for postmenopausal women.9,10 White, cremini, portobello, oyster, shiitake, maitake, and reishi mushrooms all have anti-cancer properties - some are anti-inflammatory, stimulate the immune system, prevent DNA damage, slow cancer cell growth, cause programmed cancer cell death, or inhibit angiogenesis.In addition to these properties, mushrooms are unique in that they contain aromatase inhibitors - compounds that can block the production of estrogen. These compounds are thought to be largely responsible for the preventive effects of mushrooms against breast cancer - in fact, there are aromatase-inhibiting drugs on the market that are used to treat breast cancer. Regular consumption of dietary aromatase inhibitors is an excellent strategy for prevention, and it turns out that even the most commonly eaten mushrooms (white, cremini, and portobello) have high anti-aromatase activity.11

B – Berries

Blueberries, strawberries, and blackberries are true super foods. Naturally sweet and juicy, berries are low in sugar and high in nutrients - they are among the best foods you can eat. Their vibrant colors mean that they are full of antioxidants, including flavonoids and antioxidant vitamins - berries are some of the highest antioxidant foods in existence. Berries’ plentiful antioxidant content confers both cardioprotective and anti-cancer effects, such as reducing blood pressure, reducing inflammation, preventing DNA damage, inhibiting tumor angiogenesis, and stimulating of the body’s own antioxidant enzymes.  Berry consumption has been linked to reduced risk of diabetes, cancers and cognitive decline.12 Berries are an excellent food for the brain – berry consumption improves both motor coordination and memory.13

B - Beans

Beans (and other legumes as well) are a powerhouse of superior nutrition, and the most nutrient-dense carbohydrate source. They act as an anti-diabetes and weight-loss food because they are digested slowly, having a stabilizing effect on blood sugar, which promotes satiety and helps to prevent food cravings. Plus they contain soluble fiber, which lowers cholesterol levels.14 Beans are unique foods because of their very high levels of fiber and resistant starch, carbohydrates that are not broken down by digestive enzymes.  Fiber and resistant starch not only reduce the total number of calories absorbed from beans, but are also fermented by intestinal bacteria into fatty acids that help to prevent colon cancer. Eating beans, peas, or lentils at least twice a week has been found to decrease colon cancer risk by 50%. 15,16 Legume intake also provides significant protection against oral, larynx, pharynx, stomach, and kidney cancers.17

S - Seeds

Seeds. Flickr: Tobias Klupfel

Nuts and seeds contain healthy fats and are rich in a spectrum of micronutrients including phytosterols, minerals, and antioxidants. Countless studies have demonstrated the cardiovascular benefits of nuts, and including nuts in the diet aids in weight maintenance and diabetes prevention.18,19 The nutritional profiles of seeds are similar to nuts when it comes to healthy fats, minerals, and antioxidants, but seeds are also abundant in trace minerals, higher in protein than nuts, and each kind of seed is nutritionally unique. Flax, chia, and hemp seeds are extremely rich sources of omega-3 fats. In addition to the omega-3s, flaxseeds are rich in fiber and lignans. Flaxseed consumption protects against heart disease by a number of different mechanisms, and lignans, which are present in both flaxseeds and sesame seeds, have anti-cancer effects.20 Sunflower seeds are especially rich in protein and minerals.  Pumpkin seeds are rich in iron and calcium and are a good source of zinc. Sesame seeds have the greatest amount of calcium of any food in the world, and provide abundant amounts of vitamin E. Also, black sesame seeds are extremely rich in antioxidants.21 The healthy fats in seeds and nuts also aid in the absorption of nutrients when eaten with vegetables.

 

References:


1. Carter P, Gray LJ, Troughton J, et al. Fruit and vegetable intake and incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ. 2010 Aug 18;341:c4229.

Journal of Clinical Investigation (2011, March 24). High levels of dietary nitrate might in part explain the vascular benefits of diets rich in leafy greens. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 30, 2011, from http://www.sciencedaily.com­ /releases/2011/03/110323135631.htm

2. Stringham JM, Bovier ER, Wong JC, Hammond BR Jr. The influence of dietary lutein and zeaxanthin on visual performance. J Food Sci. 2010 Jan-Feb;75(1):R24-9.

3. Higdon JV, Delage B, Williams DE, Dashwood RH. Cruciferous vegetables and human cancer risk: epidemiologic evidence and mechanistic basis. Pharmacol Res. 2007 Mar;55(3):224-36.

Cavell BE, Syed Alwi SS, Donlevy A, et al., Anti-angiogenic effects of dietary isothiocyanates: mechanisms of action and implications for human health. Biochem. Pharmacol., 2011. 81(3): p. 327-36.

4. Powolny AA, Singh SV. Multitargeted prevention and therapy of cancer by diallyl trisulfide and related Allium vegetable-derived organosulfur compounds. Cancer Lett. 2008 Oct 8;269(2):305-14.

5. Pierini R, Gee JM, Belshaw NJ, et al. Flavonoids and intestinal cancers. Br J Nutr. 2008 May;99 E Suppl 1:ES53-9.

6. Slimestad R, Fossen T, Vågen IM. Onions: a source of unique dietary flavonoids. J Agric Food Chem. 2007 Dec 12;55(25):10067-80.

7. Miyamoto S, Yasui Y, Ohigashi H, et al. Dietary flavonoids suppress azoxymethane-induced colonic preneoplastic lesions in male C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice. Chem Biol Interact. 2010 Jan 27;183(2):276-83.

Shan BE, Wang MX, Li RQ. Quercetin inhibit human SW480 colon cancer growth in association with inhibition of cyclin D1 and survivin expression through Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway. Cancer Invest. 2009 Jul;27(6):604-12.

Xavier CP, Lima CF, Preto A, et al. Luteolin, quercetin and ursolic acid are potent inhibitors of proliferation and inducers of apoptosis in both KRAS and BRAF mutated human colorectal cancer cells. Cancer Lett. 2009 Aug 28;281(2):162-70.

8. Ravasco P, Aranha MM, Borralho PM, et al. Colorectal cancer: Can nutrients modulate NF-kappaB and apoptosis? Clin Nutr. 2010 Feb;29(1):42-46.

9. Hong SA, Kim K, Nam SJ, et al: A case-control study on the dietary intake of mushrooms and breast cancer risk among Korean women. Int J Cancer 2008, 122:919-923.

Shin A, Kim J, Lim SY, et al: Dietary mushroom intake and the risk of breast cancer based on hormone receptor status. Nutr Cancer 2010, 62:476-483.

Zhang M, Huang J, Xie X, et al: Dietary intakes of mushrooms and green tea combine to reduce the risk of breast cancer in Chinese women. Int J Cancer 2009, 124:1404-1408.

10. Hara M, Hanaoka T, Kobayashi M, et al: Cruciferous vegetables, mushrooms, and gastrointestinal cancer risks in a multicenter, hospital-based case-control study in Japan. Nutr Cancer 2003, 46:138-147.

11. Chen S, Oh SR, Phung S, et al: Anti-aromatase activity of phytochemicals in white button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus). Cancer Res 2006, 66:12026-12034.

12. Bazzano LA, Li TY, Joshipura KJ, Hu FB. Intake of fruit, vegetables, and fruit juices and risk of diabetes in women. Diabetes Care. 2008 Jul;31(7):1311-7.

Hannum SM. Potential impact of strawberries on human health: a review of the science. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2004;44(1):1-17.

Joseph JA, Shukitt-Hale B, Willis LM. Grape juice, berries, and walnuts affect brain aging and behavior. J Nutr. 2009 Sep;139(9):1813S-7S.

Stoner GD, Wang LS, Casto BC. Laboratory and clinical studies of cancer chemoprevention by antioxidants in berries. Carcinogenesis. 2008 Sep;29(9):1665-74.

Cassidy A, O'Reilly EJ, Kay C, et al: Habitual intake of flavonoid subclasses and incident hypertension in adults. Am J Clin Nutr 2011, 93:338-347.

Roy S, Khanna S, Alessio HM, et al: Anti-angiogenic property of edible berries. Free Radic Res 2002, 36:1023-1031.

13. Bickford PC, Shukitt-Hale B, Joseph J. Effects of aging on cerebellar noradrenergic function and motor learning: nutritional interventions. Mech Ageing Dev. 1999 Nov;111(2-3):141-54.

Krikorian R, Shidler MD, Nash TA, et al. Blueberry supplementation improves memory in older adults. J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Apr 14;58(7):3996-4000.

14. Bazzano LA, Thompson AM, Tees MT, et al. Non-soy legume consumption lowers cholesterol levels: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis 2011 Feb;21(2):94-103.

Aune D, De Stefani E, Ronco A, et al. Legume intake and the risk of cancer: a multisite case-control study in Uruguay. Cancer Causes Control. 2009 Nov;20(9):1605-15.

15. O'Keefe SJ, Ou J, Aufreiter S, et al. Products of the colonic microbiota mediate the effects of diet on colon cancer risk. J Nutr. 2009 Nov;139(11):2044-8.

16. Singh PN, Fraser GE. Dietary risk factors for colon cancer in a low-risk population. Am J Epidemiol. 1998 Oct 15;148(8):761-74.

17. Aune D, De Stefani E, Ronco A, et al. Legume intake and the risk of cancer: a multisite case-control study in Uruguay. Cancer Causes Control. 2009 Nov;20(9):1605-15.

18. Nash SD, Nash DT. Nuts as part of a healthy cardiovascular diet. Curr Atheroscler Rep. 2008 Dec;10(6):529-35.

Sabaté J, Ang Y. Nuts and health outcomes: new epidemiologic evidence. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 May;89(5):1643S-1648S.

Mattes RD et al. Impact of peanuts and tree nuts on body weight and healthy weight loss in adults. J Nutr. 2008 Sep;138(9):1741S-1745S.

Natoli S, McCoy P. A review of the evidence: nuts and body weight. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2007;16(4):588-97

19. Kendall CW, Josse AR, Esfahani A, Jenkins DJ. Nuts, metabolic syndrome and diabetes. Br J Nutr. 2010 Aug;104(4):465-73.

20. Bassett CM, Rodriguez-Leyva D, Pierce GN. Experimental and clinical research findings on the cardiovascular benefits of consuming flaxseed. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2009 Oct;34(5):965-74.

Webb AL, McCullough ML. Dietary lignans: potential role in cancer prevention. Nutr Cancer. 2005;51(2):117-31.

Saarinen NM, Wärri A, Airio M, et al. Role of dietary lignans in the reduction of breast cancer risk. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2007 Jul;51(7):857-66.

Coulman KD, Liu Z, Hum WQ, et al. Whole sesame seed is as rich a source of mammalian lignan precursors as whole flaxseed. Nutr Cancer. 2005;52(2):156-65.

21. Shahidi F, Liyana-Pathirana CM, Wall DS. Antioxidant activity of white and black sesame seeds and their hull fractions. Food Chemistry 2006;99(3): 478-483.

 

Eating to Live on the Outside: The Vegetable Garden

Happy Friday! Let’s go on a journey, a digital journey. Fire up the internet, we’re heading to The Vegetable Garden in Rockville, Maryland. And this place is loaded with veggie fare.

It took me awhile and several run-throughs to decide what I’d eat. So, after much deliberation, here’s of list of things I might order. Have a look:

Whole Wheat Steamed Dumplings

  • Wheat flour, green chard, carrots, firm tofu and rice vermicelli; the vermicelli is a little iffy, but the chard is cool.

Spinach Roll

  • Spinach, sesame and sesame dressing; rock on spinach!

Asparagus Seaweed Roll

  • Fresh asparagus, carrots, lettuce, sea salt and sesame dressing; skipping the salt, but everything else is fine.

Vegetable Garden Salad

  • Romaine lettuces, carrot, red cabbage, cucumber, grape tomato, red bell peppers, green bell peppers, roasted pine nuts, mandarin orange, dried cranberries and rice vinegar dressing; I’d get the dressing on the side.

Mugwort Soba Noodle Salad

  • Wheat flour, buckwheat flour, sea salt, mugwort leaves, organic radicchio, organic cabbage, organic Romaine lettuce, organic carrots, organic maple syrup, organic marukan rice vinegar, black-pepper, roasted sesame seed, roasted sliced almond and virgin olive oil; I’ll ditch the salt and ask for the oil on the side.
Asparagus with Oyster Mushroom
  • Yuba, oyster mushroom, asparagus and brown sauce; I’d ask about the brown sauce, the asparagus is awesome.

Eight Treasure Eggplant

  • Dried eggplant, shitake mushrooms, yellow squash, zucchini, red bell pepper, lily bulb, pine nuts, dried cranberries, cashew nuts, firm tofu and spicy sauce; just ask about the sauce, otherwise a ton of veggies!

Bamboo Raft

  • Marinated yuba, celery, carrots, asparagus, shiitake mushrooms, jicama, steamed green cabbage leaves, curry and coconut milk sauce; go easy on the sauce.

Lo Hen Cantaloupe

  • Yuba, cucumber celery, butternut squash, jicama, cantaloupe, black mushrooms, pecans, cashews, dried cranberries, curry and coconut sauce; same deal, watch the sauce.

Pearl Squash

  • Butternut squash, fresh lily bulb, ginger, red bell peppers, beets and light black bean sauce; watch that sauce again.

Jian Pao Vegi-Gourmet

  • Asparagus, firm tofu, lily bulb, sugar snap peas, oyster mushroom, yellow squash, red bell pepper and spicy sauce; yup, again with the sauce.

Bean Nest

  • Red kidney beans, chic peas, baby lima, lentil, adzuki beans, pinto beans, black soy beans and brown sauce; all those beans, I wonder what will happen.

Alright, that is a lot of food to choose from. I mean come on! Now, as for my exact order, I’d either get the Vegetable Garden Salad, Bean Nest or any number of the veggie rolls.

I give The Vegetable Garden the seal of approval, but what about you? Check out their menu and let me know how you handle Eating to Live on the Outside.

Image credit: The Vegetable Garden

Eat Foods That Fill You Up - Volume, Volume, Volume!

Our hunger drive craves volume. A key skill that you are developing for your health is the ability to eat large volumes of raw and cooked, high-nutrient, low-calorie foods every single day. This means eating lots of vegetables.

When you are actively trying to lose weight, you should strive to satisfy your volume requirements first, before addressing the other dimensions of hunger. This may feel strange at first because you may not immediately feel satisfied by the higher volume of food. This is because you are accustomed to eating large quantities of high-calorie foods that cause a dopamine rush, a rush that low-calorie foods don’t deliver. However, your body will adjust, be less dependent on the dopamine surge in the brain, and will gradually become more and more satisfied with fewer calories. Give yourself time, and use the knowledge you have gained. Striving to fulfill your body’s volume and nutrient requirements can help you resolve food cravings and your toxic hunger.

The trick to get you to desire fewer calories faster is to eat lots of these high-volume, high-nutrient foods. You are already familiar with these, but many of the foods that you have been incorporating into your diet because of their nutrient values are also great tools in meeting your volume requirements. They include:

  • Raw Vegetables: lettuce, tomatoes, peppers, celery, anise, snow pea pods, carrots, beets, cucumbers, water chestnuts, red cabbage, onion
  • Most Fresh Fruits: melons, oranges, grapefruits, apples, kiwis, berries, papaya
  • Cooked Green Vegetables: Brussels sprouts, string beans, artichokes, asparagus, broccoli, Chinese cabbage, bok choy
  • Other Non-Green Vegetables: mushrooms, eggplant, sun-dried tomatoes, onions, bean sprouts, cauliflower, spaghetti squash

Especially on holidays and days when you know that you will be around a lot of unhealthy foods, pre-fill with these high-nutrient, low-calorie foods. Never go to a party or event with an empty stomach. Eat a large salad with assorted raw vegetables and a bowl of vegetable soup before going to the places that may tempt your desire to eat unhealthily. Being healthy is about being in control. You must control your hunger, and the more low-calorie, high-volume foods you consume, the less high-calorie food you will be able to eat. When you increase these super healthy foods in your diet, you will feel less temptation, and you will be in control of your food cravings and appetite.

This is an excerpt from Dr. Fuhrman’s book Eat For Health.

Image credit: sictransitgloria

Eating to Live on the Outside: Grezzo Restaurant

After a week off, Eating to Live on the Outside is back. And today I found Grezzo Restaurant in Boston and it’s got a lot of potential. Grezzo serves up a ton of veggies!

Having flipped through their online menu, here’s a bunch of things I’d consider ordering. Some are pretty wild and very unique, take a look:

Winter Melon Stew

  • Watermelon broth, Santa Claus melon, honeydew and lavender; interesting, I’ve never even heard of Santa Claus melon!
Caesar Salad
  • Creamy lemon and dulse vinaigrette, baby iceberg lettuce, red onion, eggplant bacon and garlic croutons; I’ll skip the croutons and since they don’t use animal products, I’m curious to see what eggplant bacon is.

House Salad

  • Baby lettuce, house-made cheese, croutons and green goddess vinaigrette; same deal with the croutons and don’t worry about the cheese, its nut cheese.

Big House Salad

  • Baby lettuce, marinated and pickled vegetables, raw red wine vinaigrette, herbed cheese and croutons; again with the croutons.

Baby Arugula Salad

  • Pickled asparagus, baby arugula grapefruit, marcona almonds and soaked currants; I love asparagus!

Marinated Shiitake Mushroom and European Cucumber Salad

  • Baby iceberg, fresh garbanzos, marinated shiitake mushrooms, cucumbers and orange Thai chili cream; looks good.
Land and Sea

Like I said, pretty exotic. But if I had to choose, I’d probably go with the Land and Sea or the Big House Salad. All those mushrooms intrigue me and a salad is always a great idea.

But what would you order? Check out Grezzo’s menu and let me know how you handle Eating to Live on the Outside. Just make a comment. If  not, I'll kick your butt—kidding.

Image credit: Grezzo Restaurant

Eating to Live on the Outside: Leaf Vegetarian Restaurant

It’s Friday! Time for your favorite, Eating to Live on the Outside! This week, via the powers of the internet, we’re heading to Leaf in Boulder, Colorado. And, it looks pretty good. Lots of veggie food!

Leaf is a vegetarian restaurant, which is always a good start, so after much contemplation. Here’s a list of things I’d consider ordering.

Persian Sambusa

  • Butternut squash, caramelized onions and dried fruit chutney; sounds cool, chutney is always fun!

Thai Spring Roll

  • Rice noodle, carrot, Romaine lettuce, bean sprouts, basil, cilantro and peanut dipping sauce; the noodles are iffy, but I deal with it.

Chopped Market Salad

  • Hearts of Romaine, red bell peppers, grape tomatoes, red onion, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds and tahini vinaigrette; I like it, but with dressing on the side.

Papaya Salad

  • Green papaya, shredded carrot, tomato, fresh basil, roasted peanuts and spicy chili dressing; this type of salad is one of my favorite things, ever!

Falafel in Pita

  • Chickpea croquettes, black hummus, cucumber, lettuce tomato, red onion and tahini sauce; I’d get the dressing on the side here too.

Mushroom Burger

  • Portabella mushrooms, walnuts, onions, herbs, tomato, onion, provolone and remoulade; looks okay, but I’d ditch the remoulade.

Butternut Squash Tower

  • Butternut squash, roasted eggplant, caramelized onions, collard greens, grilled green apple, and cranberry-cashew cream; the cream is obviously nut-based, so I dig it!

Jamaican Jerk Tempeh

  • Tempeh, forbidden black rice, coconut, coconut plantain sauce, sautéed greens and fruit salsa; I’m not a big tempeh guy, but I can’t pass on the greens, even if they are sautéed.

Tomato Napoleon (Raw)

  • Heirloom tomatoes, zucchini, pine nut ricotta, sundried tomato sauce and mizuna; raw stuff always intrigues me, sounds cool!

Okay, my favorite is the Papaya Salad, whenever I see it on a menu, I have to order it! The Chopped Market Salad is cool too. Overall, I think Leaf works! Plenty of Fuhrman-friendly options and not a lot of grief, can't beat that!

Alright, it’s your turn! Check out Leaf’s menu and let me know how you handle Eating to Live on the Outside. Just drop a comment. I'm waiting. 

Image credit: Leaf Vegetarian Restaurant

Fresh Garlic Better Than Garlic Powder, Duh!

I’m Italian, so I’m required to like garlic, but that garlic powder I grew up on can’t hold a candle to fresh garlic. A new study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry claims that raw, crushed garlic has more heart-protective effects than the dried stuff.

In the study, Dipak K. Das and colleagues point out that raw, crushed garlic generates hydrogen sulfide through a chemical reaction. Although best known as the stuff that gives rotten eggs their distinctive odor, hydrogen sulfide also acts as a chemical messenger in the body, relaxing blood vessels and allowing more blood to pass through. Processed and cooked garlic, however, loses its ability to generate hydrogen sulfide.

The scientists gave freshly crushed garlic and processed garlic to two groups of lab rats, and then studied how well the animals' hearts recovered from simulated heart attacks. "Both crushed and processed garlic reduced damage from lack of oxygen, but the fresh garlic group had a significantly greater effect on restoring good blood flow in the aorta and increased pressure in the left ventricle of the heart," Das said.

Garlic is one of the foods Dr. Fuhrman recommends diabetics eat plenty of, along side green vegetables, nuts, seeds, beans, eggplant, tomatoes, mushrooms and onions. Sometimes I bake garlic cloves in the oven and spread it on wholegrain bread.

Via EurekAlert!

Image credit: Ian-S

Eating to Live on the Outside: Spread

Okay kiddies. It’s that time again. I’m firing up my imaginary jet plane for another Eating to Live on the Outside. This week, I’m “off” to San Diego, California to grab a bite to eat at Spread.

Spread’s menu is totally doable. I see a lot of veggies. Here’s quick list of foods I might order:

Flowering Arugula & Beet Salad

  • Sylvetta arugula, maple croutons, arugula flowers, marinated Chioggia beets, fuerte avocado, red carrots and blood orange thyme vinaigrette; I like it, but I’d ditch the croutons and get the dressing on the side.

Mixed Lettuces

  • Heirloom baby greens, yellow grape tomatoes, sweet onions, strawberries, French violas, baby celery, steamed baby artichokes and avocado basil dressing; lots of veggies, I dig it.

Banana Curry Oatmeal

  • Caramelized onions, banana, curry and red carrots; I’m probably a banana addict at this point.

Macadamia Rose Pesto grits

  • Roasted vegetables, handmade pesto, rose petals and macadamia; I’m not big on grits, but I’ll give it a try.

Kaffir Lime & Kumquat Glazed Vegetable Medley

  • Purple cauliflower, red carrots, heirloom squash, kaffir lime and kumquat; I love cauliflower and purpler-er the better!

Haricots Verts Almondine

  • Marcona almonds, blended oils, spices, sautéed beans and truffle; not too bad, the oil doesn’t scare me.

Wild Mushroom Ragu

Hibiscus Blossom Mole

  • Grilled vegetables, corn tortillas, hibiscus essence and rose; I’m not sure I could eat a cute little mole, but vegetables are great.

Spread looks good. It works! Okay, if I “really” had to order something, I’d go for either the Mixed Lettuces or the Flowering Arugula & Beet Salad. Both look cool.

Now listen up! You can be a fake traveler too. Just check out Spread’s menu and tell me what you’d order.

Image credit: Spread

Eating to Live on the Outside: Jhanjay Vegetarian Thai Cuisine

Quick! I need to catch a plane. This week Eating to Live on the Outside heads to Seattle to check out Jhanjay Vegetarian Thai Cuisine. It looks pretty good, but not perfect.

Jhanjay’s menu is loaded with vegetables, no doubt about that, but a lot of the food is stir-fried, which is a problem. So, with that in mind, here’s a quick list of things I might order:

Vegetarian Rolls

  • Fresh mint, green leaves, carrots, cucumbers, rice noodles, tofu, wrapped in rice paper and served with homemade sauce; the noodles and rice paper make it iffy.

House Salad

  • Romaine lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers, carrots, red cabbage and house dressing; looks cool, but dressing on the side.

Papaya Salad

  • Shaved green papaya, carrots, tomatoes, green beans and peanuts tossed with lime juice; I order this everywhere I go!

Larb Tofu

  • Chopped tofu, mushrooms, red onions, mint, chili, lime juice, cabbage and toasted rice powder; I’d ditch the rice powder.

Mango Salad

  • Sliced green mango, apple, carrots, roasted peanuts, fresh herbs and tamarind sauce; I like this too!

Sweet and Sour

  • Onions, bell peppers, carrots, cucumbers, tomatoes and pineapple stir-fried with sweet and sour sauce; lots of veggies, but the stir-frying stinks.

Broccoli Lover’s

  • Garlic, broccoli, onions, carrots and mushrooms stir-fried oyster sauce; same deal with the stir-frying.

Swimming Rama

  • Stir-fried spinach, bean sprouts and garlic topped with peanut sauce; love that spinach.

Abundant Asparagus

  • Mushroom cake, asparagus and shitake mushrooms stir-fried in garlic sauce; I have no idea what mushroom cake is, but asparagus rocks!

Mountains of Mushrooms

  • Portobello, enoki, ceps and shitake mushrooms stir-fried in special light garlic sauce; I do like mushrooms.

Jhanjay does serve up a lot of vegetables, but if I had to pick, I’m staying away from the stir-fries and going with the house salad or the papaya salad. Odds are it’d be the papaya. It’s too hard to pass up.

Okay, I know its Saturday and you might be hung over or too tired, but if you have a second, scan through Jhanjay’s menu and let me know what you’d order. Hint-hint, go with the papaya salad!

Image credit: Jhanjay Vegetarian Thai Cuisine

Eating to Live on the Outside: Saf

It’s Saturday, time for another pseudo trip to far off locations to sample the local delicacies and this week Eating to LIve on the Outside heads across the pond to the United Kingdom to grab a bite to eat at Saf a veggie restaurant boasting plant-based, botanical yum-yums. Sounds good!

Now, let’s imagine I’m really in London, sitting at table and about to order something. I better pick something fast! Okay, before the waiter comes over. Here’s a quick list of things I might order, some are better than others:

Edamame

  • Wasabi pea powder, fleur de sel and black sesame; I love edamame beans, but I’d ask them to hold the salt.

Vegetable Maki

  • Parsnip rice, shitake mushrooms, avocado and shiso & shoyu; I’d ditch the sauce.

White Bean Hummus

  • Fresh harissa, mint oil and crostini; not great because of the oil and bread, but I might consider it.

Saf Nachos

  • Sprouted crisps, avocado, salsa, tapenade, cashew sour cream and coriander; I’m okay with the crisps and hooray for avocado.

Greens & Flowers Salad

  • Baby lettuces, herbs, radishes, flowers, sprouts and citrus miso dressing; just go easy on the dressing.

Baby Kale and Avocado Salad

  • Pea shoots, sweet pepper, avocado, baby kale, lemon oil and candied pecan; same deal here.

Chopped Asian Salad

  • Smoked tofu, raddichio, watercress, pumpkin, seeds, yuzu juice and wakame seaweed; lots of great stuff here.

Tom Kha Soup

  • Coconut-lemongrass broth, baby corn, tofu, oyster mushrooms, coriander and chili oil; it might be salt, so ask first, but otherwise it looks cool.

Swiss Chard Rolls

  • Mung beans, water chestnut, Thai vinaigrette, pickled cucumber and seaweed salad; I dig it, but order the dressing on the side.

Shitake Dumplings

  • Wood ear mushrooms, Chinese cabbage, tofu, carrot and caramelized black vinegar; sounds tasty.

Hey, not too bad for my first “trip” to the London. Saf looks great. So if I really had to order something, I’d go for the Greens & Flowers Salad, Baby Kale and Avocado Salad or the Chopped Asian Salad, either one of these has enough veggies to satisfy me.

To be totally honest, if I was in London you’d probably find me hanging out in a few pubs too. Cut me a break! I’m young and single. But enough about me do me a favor. Read through Saf’s menu and tell me what you’d bloody order! Peace.

Image credit: Saf

Getting Kids Involved in the Kitchen, Safely...

Editor’s Note: This is a guest post from Gretchen Goel of Total Wellness Mentor and does NOT necessarily represent the opinions of DiseaseProof or Dr. Fuhrman.

My kids have been using The Learning Tower since they were toddlers and I can tell you it has been the most used piece of furniture in our house! It is as necessary of a purchase as a VitaMix if you have kids or even grandkids. Kids can safely climb up in it by themselves and it can be adjusted to height as your children grow.

I have our tower located next to a large assortment of fresh fruits and vegetables on our counter top. They can climb up and grab a snack whenever they want. We don't have a snack cabinet full of processed junk, just a "snack counter" full of healthy whole foods.

When we cook I move the tower to an open space so they can help measure, pour, stir, peel garlic and onions or chop easy-to-chop foods like mushrooms or herbs. They get a hands on math and cooking lesson every day, which I love since I home-school them.

I find that I rarely have issues with my kids trying new foods because I have them so involved in food preparation. My oldest daughter is 6 and she is already inventing her own healthy recipes using raw foods!

The bonus to using The Learning Tower is easily turns into a "puppet theater" for play during the day. We just throw a sheet over it and our kids sit on the platform and perform!

Image credit: The Learning Tower