Muscle Power Makes Bones Strong - Not Being Overweight or Obese

Maybe I’m an idiot. I can’t imagine being overweight or obese is good for anything—except winning belly-flop competitions—but apparently there is a school of thought out there that high body mass index helps build strong bones. Luckily, a new study shoots that pieces. Turns out muscles keep bones strong, not fat.

The researchers looked at bone density and volume, as well as lean and fat mass, in 768 men aged 25 to 45, including 296 pairs of brothers.

After the researchers adjusted for weight, they found that men's bone mass and volume fell steadily as their percentage of fat mass increased, while bone size rose in tandem with lean mass. Fat in the trunk area had a stronger influence on bone size than fat on the arms and legs.

"Lean mass," the researchers conclude, "is the major determinant of bone size, providing further evidence that bone size is adapted to the dynamic load imposed by muscle force rather than passive loading" by fat.

Dr. Fuhrman agrees with the muscle-bone link, saying, “Strong muscles and bones are married together. Working out and strengthening the muscles, thickens the bones in the process.” And in his DVD Osteoporosis Protection for Life you’ll learn how certain exercises tone muscles and build bone density.

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Weak Hip Muscles May Hurt Runners' Legs

Printed in the journal Sports Health, a new study suggests weaker hip muscles could contribute to overuse injuries, such as knee pain, shin splints, tendonitis and sore feet, in runners. Experts estimate 70% of runners sustain an overuse injury each year, with half of those injuries occurring in the knee. If hip abductors, i.e. muscles at the outer hip, are weak or easily fatigued it can cause pain under the kneecap, researchers believe strengthening hip muscles could prevent these types of injuries in runners; via Reuters.

But don’t give on your running just yet! Impact exercise like running has been shown to develop stronger bones and muscles, even better than weightlifters. Now, in Dr. Fuhrman’s DVD Osteoporosis Protection for Life he demonstrates some exercises that help strengthen your muscles and bones.

In August, a report revealed middle-aged runners were 50% less likely to die than people who did not run. Runners also had a lower risk of heart disease and cancer.

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Health-Points: Friday 5.1.09

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Mental Fatigue Makes Workouts Harder

Wow, new findings in the Journal of Applied Physiology suggest being mentally tired may cause you to become exhausted more quickly during exercise, but researchers claim your muscles and heart don’t underperform. It’s your “perceived effort” that’s dragging you down. On one day 16 participants were given a demanding 90-minute test and on another day they watched TV for 90-minutes. When put on a stationary bike 15% of subjects stopped exercising sooner when they were mentally pooped; Reuters explains.

I relate to this big time! Tell me if you do too. A year ago I exercised a ton; Yoga, running, weights and more running! But I couldn’t do it anymore, too busy. Nowadays, DiseaseProof draws major attention, so I had to step up my game, hopefully you’ve noticed. Long story short, I was leaving the gym near death. Now I’ve cut back. I still exercise 6 days a week, but for shorter intervals and no more working out twice a day. That was crazy!

Clearly, pushing yourself to mental and physical exhaustion is a dumb idea. Our bodies need sufficient rest and recovery to function properly and previous reports insist Americans are overworked and under-slept. So cut yourself a break. You probably need it.

Image credit: Happy Dave