Fruit and Veggie Antioxidants Improve Exercise Endurance

New findings in the International Journal of Sports Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism reveal quercetin—a nutrient in red apples, berries and broccoli—boosts oxygen uptake and exercise endurance. Study participants followed their regular routines and diet for 7 days and then did the same thing for another 7 days, but this time they consumed 500 milligrams of quercetin. While on quercetin people had nearly 4% more oxygen uptake and took longer to become fatigued during exercise. However, participants got quercetin from Tang, which stinks; Reuters reports.

But still, quercetin is great mojo! According to Dr. Fuhrman, blueberries are packed with quercetin and other healthful flavanoids. He recommends eating blueberries everyday. That’s why you’ll find quercetin in Dr. Fuhrman’s Pixie-Vites, along with other nutrients found in watermelon, cantaloupe, papaya, broccoli, cauliflower, beets and many other amazing fruits and vegetables.

And don’t forget, last year researchers found antioxidants and nutrients in carrots, spinach, kale and collard greens help health improve eye health and stave off age-related vision loss.

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Fatty Acids Improve Heart Health in Diabetics

A new study in the journal Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, shows omega-3 fatty acids lower blood levels of homocysteine, an amino acid known to raise the risk of heart disease. For the study, 81 diabetics were randomly assigned to groups receiving daily omega-3 supplements or a placebo. After two months, data revealed a 22% reduction of homocysteine in the omega groups, compared to only 1% for the placebo group; Nutra Ingredients explains.

Omega-3s are powerful stuff, found in foods like flaxseeds, omega-3 fatty acids have been linked to slower progression of age-related vision loss, reduced inflammation associated with cardiovascular disease, and less likelihood of repeat stroke. Not too shabby!

In March, a study showed fatty acids help lower the risk of prostate cancer. Good thing Dr. Fuhrman sells a DHA supplement that provides essential omega-3 fatty acids.

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Omega-3's May Save Your Eyesight

Go eat some walnuts! Because a new study in the British Journal of Ophthalmology claims diets rich in omega-3 fatty acids may slow the development of age-related macular degeneration. An analysis of nearly 3,000 people, randomly assigned to take three different vitamin supplements or a placebo, revealed no matter the supplement, participants with higher intake of omega-3’s were at lower risk for the progression of advanced macular degeneration; Reuters reports.

Flaxseeds are another powerful source of omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3’s are amazing! They’ve been linked to improved insulin tolerance, protection against prostate cancer and prevention of repeat strokes. Oh, and citrus fruits also help stave off age-related macular degeneration.

And last year, a report showed antioxidant carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, found in leafy green vegetables—such as collard greens, spinach and kale—promote eye health too.

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Citrus Fruits Help Stave Off Vision Loss

Its not just citrus fruits, new findings in the journal Ophthalmology suggest older adults eating a lot of leafy greens, citrus fruits and fish are less likely to develop age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a major contributor to vision lose. Studying the diets of 4,000 adults, experts claim foods rich in omega-3s, vitamin C and E, zinc and antioxidants lower the risk of AMD. These low-sugar foods do not cause surges in blood pressure, which may harm retinas; Reuters reports.

Actually, last year researchers determined plant nutrients lutein and zeaxanthin, found in foods like spinach, kale and collard greens, promote eye health and prevent cataracts, while eating red meat 10 times week increases the likelihood of age-related macular degeneration by 47%.

In related news, a recent study showed vegetable-based diabetes offer superior diabetes control and omega-3 fatty acids, like those contained in walnuts, reduce inflammation linked to heart disease.

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Red Meat Pinned to Blindness in Old Age

Sorry cows, a new study in the American Journal of Epidemiology links higher risk of age-related macular degeneration, i.e. blindness, with heavy consumption of red meat. Australian researchers recruited 6,734 people, ages 58 to 69, living in Melbourne, surveying them about how much meat they ate, and then taking macular photographs of their retinas to evaluate eye health. Findings revealed participants eating red meat 10 times a week were 47% more likely to develop age-related macular degeneration than those eating less red meat; Medical News Today reports.

Red meat is vile. In November a report found harmful bacteria, called Subtilase cytotoxin gravitates to red meat and dairy products. Then just last week, consuming large amounts of red and processed meat was associated with higher risk of cancer and cardiovascular mortality and beyond that, eating red meat has been linked to metabolic syndrome, a known predictor of heart disease.

In related news, previous research shows antioxidants from foods, such as spinach, kale and collard greens promote eye health and reduce the risk of age-related macular degeneration.

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