Exercise and Education at Dr. Fuhrman's Weekend Immersion

Saturday started out with a bang - an exercise session led by Dr. Fuhrman!

exercise

Everyone worked up quite an appetite, and then headed down to breakfast for a beautiful array of fresh fruit, hot oatmeal, a green smoothie, and Apple Surprise.  

breakfast


Dr. Fuhrman gave his first lecture today on a crucial topic, especially those new to high nutrient eating: Food Addiction and Overeating.  Dr. Fuhrman explained the four dimensions of hunger, and then the two components of food addiction: detoxification/withdrawal (also known as “toxic hunger”) and the brain’s dopamine system.  Scientists have now found that unhealthy food works like an addictive drug in the brain, and Dr. Fuhrman is presenting this science to the attendees here so that they can understand how dangerous and habit-forming unhealthy food truly is!

Dr. Fuhrman also discussed several other factors that contribute to overeating - such as emotional issues and micronutrient inadequacy; he then went on to talk about eating nuts and seeds for good health.
lecture

Did you know...

  • that the resistant starch in beans promotes “good” bacteria, binds and removes cholesterol from the intestinal tract, and protects against colon cancer?
  • that nuts are a weight-loss food?
  • that eating nuts with vegetables helps the body to absorb the nutrients in the vegetables?


These are just a few of the many bits of nutritional knowledge that the Immersion attendees have learned so far - all before lunchtime!

And speaking of lunchtime... 

Black bean mango salad

Also this morning, we unveiled Dr. Fuhrman's new Kale is the New Beef T-shirts!

Kale is the new beef

And there's more to come this afternoon and evening!

 

More Garden Bounty

For those of you new to the blog, I was formerly an obese and chronically malnourished food addict who has been completely set free from all food addictions and eating disorders; including anorexia, nutrient restrictive dieting, yo-yo dieting, and binge eating disorder as result of embracing the nutritarian lifestyle that’s described in Eat to Live and Eat for Health. Here is my transformation.

It’s been hot and sunny in Indiana, and the tomatoes are ripening almost faster than I can pick them. This novice gardener is becoming addicted to growing vegetables as I’m already starting to plan my garden for next year!

I discovered a practical and innovative way to store up the bountiful harvest.

I took the overflowing supply of garden vegetables: zucchini, summer squash, cabbage, kale, and tomatoes galore; and combined them with various other vegetables that I had on hand, and made a “Harvest Puree” that I’m freezing to use as a base for soups, sauces, and even salad dressings this upcoming winter.

I followed the basic principles of making Anti-Cancer Soup as demonstrated in Joel and Lisa Fuhrman’s Secrets to Healthy Cooking DVD, except I used less water to make it the thickness of sauce instead of soup.

The puree is a deep shade of red, and full of vital nutrients.

Cost?

Cheaper than a bottle of cough syrup, trip to the doctor, and three days of missed work productivity.

Cheaper than a trip to the plus size “fashion” store to buy yet another size of black stretch pants.

Cheaper than the quart of cookie dough ice cream on the way home to drown the sorrows.

And cheaper than the anti-acid medicine needed before bed.

And much cheaper than the vial of insulin (a.k.a. liquid gold) that will be needed on down the road.

Cost?

Priceless.

Nutritional excellence; cheaper than…you fill in the blank!

CSA Boxed Share 7.6.09

I always get excited when I pick up my share for the week and the box is heavy—means there’s a bunch of cool stuff inside. Although, it’s pretty funny to watch a big tattooed galoot like me carrying a box of organic veggies around and then taking pictures of it like a mental patient.

Now, this week was packed with goodies. There was red leaf lettuce, kale, zucchini, cabbage, garlic, beets, fennel, onions, cucumbers and a flying saucer-looking gourd of some sort. I usually give the beets to my mom. It’s funny to watch her get ticked that they stain her hands. I’m evil.

Vegetarians Have Less Cancer Risk than Meat-Eaters -- UPDATE --

New findings in the British Journal of Cancer reveal of the 60,000 Britons studied those who were vegetarian—half of them—had a lower risk of developing cancer, compared to meat-eaters. The research followed participants for 12.2 years, with 3,350 incidences of cancer. The number of meat-ears who developed cancer was 2,204 and 829 among vegetarians—only 317 fish-eaters got cancer. Overall, vegetarians were 12% less likely to get cancer; Medical News Today reports.

But vegetarian and vegan diets most often aren’t ideal. Dr. Fuhrman points out many vegans and vegetarians are often deficient in things like omega-3’s, found in fish. Dr. Fuhrman’s DHA Purity can help. It’s derived from microalgae and supplies plenty of brain-building omega–3 fatty acids.

In related news, animal fat was shown to raise the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, while leafy green vegetables—such as kale and cabbage—help fight and protect against cancer.

UPDATE: Dr. Fuhrman had some additional thoughts: 

A vegan diet can be ideal if well designed as can be a diet with a small amount of animal products, such as one or two servings a week. A nutritarian diet is designed to reverse disease and promote longer life, and features:

  • Adequate depth and variety of nutrient-rich natural foods
  • Limited animal products, but adequate ALA/EPA/DHA
  • Adequate whole food plant fats and proteins from seeds, nuts and beans
  • High intake of green and cruciferous vegetables
  • Careful attention to supplements or lab tests to assure no deficiencies are present with genetic variation of absorption and variable needs

Image credit: Carly & Art

CSA Boxed Share 6.22.09

For the first time ever, I didn’t find any marked down fruits and veggies, but I’m a resourceful little bugger. A couple weeks ago my community supported agriculture started up again. So this week, instead of cheap manager’s special produce, let’s see what’s inside my box share.

A whole bunch of cool stuff! I got lots of broccoli and zucchinis, tons of lettuce and radicchio, some garlic tops, little bit of kale and a nice fat Napa cabbage. I split the share with my friend. So I kept the kale, a couple broccolis, lettuce, a zucchini and a few garlic tops. Nice!

Omega-3's May Save Your Eyesight

Go eat some walnuts! Because a new study in the British Journal of Ophthalmology claims diets rich in omega-3 fatty acids may slow the development of age-related macular degeneration. An analysis of nearly 3,000 people, randomly assigned to take three different vitamin supplements or a placebo, revealed no matter the supplement, participants with higher intake of omega-3’s were at lower risk for the progression of advanced macular degeneration; Reuters reports.

Flaxseeds are another powerful source of omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3’s are amazing! They’ve been linked to improved insulin tolerance, protection against prostate cancer and prevention of repeat strokes. Oh, and citrus fruits also help stave off age-related macular degeneration.

And last year, a report showed antioxidant carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, found in leafy green vegetables—such as collard greens, spinach and kale—promote eye health too.

Image credit: flora.cyclam

Cancer Alert: Your Best Defense - Go Cruciferous

We may not have eaten so healthfully our entire lives. We may have a family history of breast, prostate or colon cancer. What should we do? Just wait until cancer is found?

Getting medical screenings is certainly a personal decision, but if you want to know what you can really do to protect yourself—eat lots of colorful vegetables, specifically including lots of green cruciferous vegetables. Eating a diet rich in cruciferous vegetables is your best defense for fighting and preventing cancer.

If we really want to win the war against cancer, we must improve the nutritional quality of our diet. We have all heard about the antioxidant effects our bodies derive from the phytochemicals in plant foods. However, the unique phytochemicals found in cruciferous vegetables offer superior benefits. Cruciferous vegetables contain phytochemicals that have unique abilities to modify human hormones, detoxify compounds, and prevent toxic compounds from binding to human DNA, preventing toxins from causing DNA damage that could lead to cancer. Studies have even shown that genetic defects that may lead to cancer are suppressed by the consumption of green cruciferous vegetables.

Certainly, many studies have shown that eating fresh fruits, beans, vegetables, seeds, and nuts reduces the occurrence of cancer. I plotted cancer incidence in 25 countries against unrefined plant food intake and found that as vegetables, beans, and fruit consumption goes up 20% in a population, cancer rates typically drop 20%. But cruciferous vegetables are different; they have been shown to be twice as effective. As cruciferous vegetable intake goes up 20%, in a population, cancer rates drop 40%.

Great choices include: arugula, bok choy, broccoli, broccoli rabe, brocollina, brussels sprouts cabbage, cauliflower, collards, horseradish, kale, kohlrabi, mustard greens, radish, red cabbage, rutabaga, turnips, turnip greens and watercress.

Include them in both raw and cooked forms and eat a variety of them. These benefits cannot be duplicated by taking any one pre-formed compound or supplement.

The evidence is now overwhelming that cruciferous vegetables play a major and unique role in the widely recognized protective effects of natural plant foods against cancer—and are the most important players in this arena. The biologically active compounds from raw and conservatively cooked green vegetables enhance the natural defenses of the human body against DNA damage and they even fuel the body's ability to block growth and replication of cells that are already damaged. For those in the know, these foods are the most important nutritional factors to prevent common human cancers.

Read more about Cruciferous Vegetables—what they are and how they benefit us along with the studies that support these claims—in the July 2007 Healthy Times Newsletter plus get great-tasting cruciferous-rich recipes!

Selected References

Michaud DS, Spiegelman D, Clinton SK. Fruit and vegetable intake and incidence of bladder cancer in a male prospective cohort. J Natl Cancer Inst 1999; 91(7):605-13.

Link LB, Potter JD. Raw versus cooked vegetables and cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2004;13(9):1422-35.

Miller AB. Nutritional aspects of human carcinogenesis. IARC Sci Publ 1982;(39):177-92.

Higdon JV, Delage B, Williams DE, Dashwood RH. Cruciferous vegetables and human cancer risk: epidemiologic evidence and mechanistic basis. Pharmacol Res. 2007; 55(3):224-36.

Steinmetz KA, Potter JD. Vegetables, fruit, and cancer prevention: a review. J Am Diet Assoc 1996 Oct;96(10):1027-1039.

Lee SA, Fowke JH, Lu W. Cruciferous vegetables, the GSTP1 Ile105Val genetic polymorphism, and breast cancer risk. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008; 87(3):753-60.

Rose P, Huang Q, Ong CN, Whiteman M. Broccoli and watercress suppress matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity and invasiveness of human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 2005(10);S0041-008X.

Johnston N. Sulforaphane halts breast cancer cell growth. Drug Discov Today 2004;9(21):908.

Srivastava SK, Xiao D, Lew KL, et al. Allyl isothiocyanate, a constituent of cruciferous vegetables, inhibits growth of PC-3 human prostate cancer xenografts in vivo. Carcinogenesis 2003 Oct;24(10):1665-1670.

Finley JW. The antioxidant responsive element (ARE) may explain the protective effects of cruciferous vegetables on cancer. Nutr Rev 2003 Jul;61(7):250-254.

Seow A, Yuan JM, Sun CL, et al. Dietary isothiocyanates, glutathione S-transferase polymorphisms and colorectal cancer risk in the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Carcinogenesis 2002 Dec;23(12):2055-206.

Image credit: jennconspiracy

Eating to Live on the Outside: The Green Bean

Wow! I’m tired. I blog a lot! So by the end of the week I’m pooped, but before I chill out. Time to take a “trip” to The Green Bean in my favorite stomping ground New York City. It’s an organic vegetarian restaurant, which makes it a surefire winner for Eating to Live on the Outside, right?

Yup, it looks really good. I see kale, tomatoes, lettuce, mushrooms, beans, peppers and all sorts of great stuff. But before I make my final decisions, here’s a rough draft of food I might order:

Hot Organic Oatmeal

  • Oatmeal, apple sauce, cinnamon, raisins and cranberries; sounds good, along with chocolate and sushi, oatmeal is a vice of mine.

Texas Style Veggie Burger

  • Grilled soy patty, soy cheddar cheese, tomato, onion, Romaine lettuce, soy mayo, Dijon mustard, pickles, barbecue sauce, salt and pepper served on a seven-grain bun; its okay, but I’d ditch the fake cheese and mayo and the salt.

California Tofu Wrap

  • Tofu or soy cheddar, avocado, onion, tomato, Romaine lettuce and soy mayo in a whole-wheat tortilla; I’d go with the tofu and pass on the faux cheddar and mayonnaise.

Couscous with Veggies and Tofu

  • Organic whole-wheat couscous, grilled vegetables and tofu; sounds pretty cool to me.

Three Layer Casserole

  • Organic sweet potatoes, black beans, millet and mushrooms, served with steamed kale; got to love that kale!

Organic Tofu Brazilian Stew

  • Potatoes, sweet potatoes, celery, onions, mushrooms, tomato, carrots, olive oil, bay leaf, parsley, garlic, fresh herbs and served with brown rice; looks good, I’m okay with the rice and oil.

Green Bean Garden Salad

  • Field greens, tofu, cucumber, peppers, zucchini, tomato, sweet potato and garlic ginger dressing; lots of greens, you can’t go wrong, but dressing on the side just to be safe.

Garden Grill

  • Grilled eggplant, zucchini, yellow squash, roasted peppers, olive oil, pesto on seven grain bread; you might be leery about the grilling, but I mostly eat steamed food, so I can deal with it.

Italian Mob

  • Roasted organic peppers, mozzarella soy cheese, basil and sun-dried tomatoes served on seven grain bread; pass on the cheese.

California Grill

  • Roasted red peppers, eggplant, zucchini, onions and goat cheese on seven grain bread; I’d skip the cheese and no worries about the bread.

Yeah, The Green Bean is really cool, especially since a lot of the food is organic. Hard to beat that! But if I really had to pick something, I’m going with the Three Layer Casserole or the Green Bean Garden Salad. Both look good and satisfy my green veggie requirement.

Now, you might want to play around with some of their smoothies and juices, like Blood, Body Fuel and The Three Amigos. They look pretty interesting too. Okay, it’s that time again. Flip through The Green Bean’s menu and let me know what you’d order. Have fun!

 

Image credit: The Green Bean

Citrus Fruits Help Stave Off Vision Loss

Its not just citrus fruits, new findings in the journal Ophthalmology suggest older adults eating a lot of leafy greens, citrus fruits and fish are less likely to develop age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a major contributor to vision lose. Studying the diets of 4,000 adults, experts claim foods rich in omega-3s, vitamin C and E, zinc and antioxidants lower the risk of AMD. These low-sugar foods do not cause surges in blood pressure, which may harm retinas; Reuters reports.

Actually, last year researchers determined plant nutrients lutein and zeaxanthin, found in foods like spinach, kale and collard greens, promote eye health and prevent cataracts, while eating red meat 10 times week increases the likelihood of age-related macular degeneration by 47%.

In related news, a recent study showed vegetable-based diabetes offer superior diabetes control and omega-3 fatty acids, like those contained in walnuts, reduce inflammation linked to heart disease.

Image credit: Yannick .

Introducing Dr. Fuhrman's Healthy Additions

Looking for healthy convenience in a fast food world? The choices are typically limited and compromised with high sodium and fat while offering little substance. I have created 3 high nutrient products to make healthy eating convenient, great tasting, and satisfying!

VitaBeanaVegaMin Soup

  • Contains the full spectrum of vitamins, minerals, carotenoids and phytochemicals from carefully selected, natural, nutrient-rich foods. These disease-fighting foods may be the most powerful medicine to extend human lifespan and to prevent cancer, heart attacks, strokes and dementia.

Supreme Greens

  • Kale and mustard greens are two cruciferous vegetables loaded with disease-protecting nutrients. Supreme Greens combines kale and mustard greens with a creamy tomato-cashew sauce for a delicious dish that tastes great.

Moroccan Chickpea Stew

  • This flavorful, sweet and spicy stew is distinguished with a mix of both light (Kabuli) and dark (Desi) chickpeas. Desi chickpeas have markedly higher fiber content. The combination adds a mild, nutty-flavor to the vegetable stew to offer heart-healthy nutrients and a powerful protein punch.

Scientific studies reveal colorful, natural foods contain thousands of health protective nutrients, including phytochemicals, which are essential for excellent health. All of my Healthy Additions products contain a variety of phytochemical filled natural plant foods to create the healthiest and most nutritious products that also taste great.

Each can is like a meal by itself, packed with hearty ingredients, nutrients, and flavor! Visit www.DrFuhrman.com/HealthyAdditions to learn more about Healthy Additions. Stay tuned, for Healthy Additions Salad Dressings coming soon!!


Image credit: DrFuhrman.com