Cancer in Minorities to Skyrocket in 20 Years...

According to a new study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology cancer cases among Hispanics and African Americans could reach 157 million by 2030, up from 46 million in 1980. For the study, scientists analyzed information from a national health database and projected Hispanics will experience the highest increase in cancer incidence with 142%. Now, these figures may be higher than what will actually happen, but researchers warn the trends are very clear and strong; HealthDay News investigates.

Actually, many experts believe these trends can be reversed with better diet, i.e. more fruits and vegetables, and more exercise. Plant foods are potent cancer fighters. Just yesterday pomegranates were shown to improve prostate cancer recovery. Also, switching to a diet including more fiber and less sugar can stave off diabetes in Latinos.

In related news, recent studies show foods like green vegetables and nuts help prevent ovarian cancer, while stuff like charred meat raises the risk of pancreatic cancer.

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More Fiber, Less Sugar Cuts Diabetes Risk in Latinos

New findings in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine suggest eating more fiber and less sugar can lower the risk of type-2 diabetes in adolescent Latinos. For the study, 66 overweight Latino teenagers were put into three groups. One group attended weekly classes on nutrition, specifically reducing sugar and increasing fiber. Group two was given nutrition education twice a week and did some strength training. The final group served as a control. After 16 weeks teens who ate less sugar and more fiber had substantial drops in blood glucose and insulin levels; Reuters reports.

In New York City, type-2 diabetes hits ethnic groups hard as they abandon traditional diets in favor of standard American fare, 800,000 people in NYC have diabetes. Yesterday, a study showed 22% of Hispanic children in America, ages 1 to 4, are obese. Dr. Fuhrman recommends the whole family eat healthy early to promote good eating habits later in life.

In related news, research shows children going to high school within walking distance of fast food restaurants are more likely to eat less fruits and vegetables and drink more soda.

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