Green-News: Wednesday 7.1.09

  • Would you pay $175 a year to fight global warming? I think I would. That’s what experts say new climate change legislation will cost the average household each year. The $175 comes from the increased cost of doing business and higher sticker price for consumer products—like cars and refrigerators—but many households can expect rebates; via The Daily Green.

Image credit: davipt

Green-News: Wednesday 6.17.09

Image credit: jk_scotland

Green-News: Wednesday 5.20.09

  • Despite the confederacy of deniers, a new study in The Lancet suggests climate change poses the greatest challenge to health, claiming warmer temps worsen disease patterns—like malaria and dengue fever—compromise water and sanitation, and cause extreme weather. Experts say the problem has been neglected and now needs immediate attention; Med Page Today reports.
  • The infamous Kyoto treaty has been largely viewed as soft on greenhouse gas emissions, with countries like the United States and China resistant to making major changes to reduce their carbon output, but now, acknowledging the shift to a low-carbon global economy, China is working to develop a better climate deal; The U.K. Guardian reports.

Image credit: malavoda

Green-News: Wednesday 4.29.09

  • However, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton says the U.S. should lead the negotiations toward a global treaty on climate change. Meeting with other countries, accounting for 75% of emissions, Clinton insists there is no longer any questions that growing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide are warming the planet, which can propose economic, health and security challenges; The New York Times reports.
  • Speaking of public health, greenhouse gases contain harmful compounds like methane, nitrous oxide, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons and sulfur hexafluoride that threaten human health. Additionally, higher temperatures can cause droughts, floods, wildfires, rising sea level and disruptions of agriculture; from Fresh Greens.

Image credit: NCinDC

Green-News: Tuesday 1.27.09

  • The economy is suffering. And unemployment is rising. But green jobs are expected to boom, such as farmers, CSA coordinators, recyclers, conservation biologists and solar power installers. Currently, the solar industry employs over 25,000 workers, but it could leap to 110,000 by 2016; via FastCompany.
  • Speaking of community supported agriculture. There are plenty of reasons to eat local! Locally grown food tastes better, retains more nutrients, contains no genetically modified organisms, promotes genetic diversity, and is better for the environment and preserves open spaces; from Green Living Review.
  • Now, despite out obvious recession, interest in green products continues to grow. A new survey of 9,000 consumers revealed shoppers deliberately bought more green products in 2008 than any year before. In 2007, 32% of people sought green products, but in 2008 it increased to 34%; ENN reports.
  • Under the new administration, government officials are hopeful the "Bigger Better Bottle Bill" has its first real shot at becoming law. The legislation would impose a nickel deposit on non-carbonated beverage containers and invest unredeemed deposits into state cleanup programs; The Post-Standard explains.

Image credit: Dog Company

Green-News: Monday 12.15.08

  • Mexico pledges to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 50% by 2050, making it one of the few developing countries to set such a goal. They’ll use solar power, wind power and other clean technologies to meet the mark. Officials hope other countries follow; via the Associated Press.

Pig Poop into Power...

Bacon doesn’t grow on trees. In fact, rearing just 300-grams of pork sucks up 1,440 liters of water and only 6-ounces of pork spews 1,108 grams of carbon, not to mention meat’s hefty fuel cost and disease-promoting effects. That’s why a group of eco-conscious farmers are cutting emissions by cooking the poop from their 3,000 pigs. It captures methane and can provide electricity to the local grid; The New York Times investigates.