CSA Boxed Share 8.17.09

Yesterday was interesting, just look at that bizarre mutant tomato! I think it’s related to Swamp Thing. But the rest of the box share was pretty tame: basil, lettuce, parsley, zucchini, squash, green peppers, purple peppers, garlic, potatoes, cabbage, eggplant, hot peppers and more tomatoes. All good stuff!

 

Fresh Garlic Better Than Garlic Powder, Duh!

I’m Italian, so I’m required to like garlic, but that garlic powder I grew up on can’t hold a candle to fresh garlic. A new study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry claims that raw, crushed garlic has more heart-protective effects than the dried stuff.

In the study, Dipak K. Das and colleagues point out that raw, crushed garlic generates hydrogen sulfide through a chemical reaction. Although best known as the stuff that gives rotten eggs their distinctive odor, hydrogen sulfide also acts as a chemical messenger in the body, relaxing blood vessels and allowing more blood to pass through. Processed and cooked garlic, however, loses its ability to generate hydrogen sulfide.

The scientists gave freshly crushed garlic and processed garlic to two groups of lab rats, and then studied how well the animals' hearts recovered from simulated heart attacks. "Both crushed and processed garlic reduced damage from lack of oxygen, but the fresh garlic group had a significantly greater effect on restoring good blood flow in the aorta and increased pressure in the left ventricle of the heart," Das said.

Garlic is one of the foods Dr. Fuhrman recommends diabetics eat plenty of, along side green vegetables, nuts, seeds, beans, eggplant, tomatoes, mushrooms and onions. Sometimes I bake garlic cloves in the oven and spread it on wholegrain bread.

Via EurekAlert!

Image credit: Ian-S

Eating to Live on the Outside: Fasika Ethiopian Restaurant

As a Yankees fan going to bean town is almost a sacrilege, but sometimes we all have to make sacrifices. This week Eating to Live on the Outside “travels” to Fasika in Boston, Massachusetts.

Baseball loyalties aside, Fasika looks like a great place to eat. They serve food made with a variety of vegetables, like collard greens, cabbage and eggplant. Here are some good choices:

Ethiopian Salad

  • Romaine lettuce, tomatoes, red onions and jalapeno peppers in lemon vinaigrette; nothing wrong with this, but I’d order the dressing on the side.

Azifa

  • Lentil salad with jalapeno peppers, onions and vinegar; looks cool.

Tegabino

  • Traditional sauce made from roasted legumes and Berbere; beans are great and musical too!

Yé-Misir Wot

  • Split lentils cooked in berbere sauce; no problems here.

Yé-kik Alicha

  • Split peas cooked in garlic and ginger sauce; I dig it.

Yé-Gomen Wot

  • Collard green leaves sautéed with onions and garlic; the sautéing is iffy, but the collard greens are awesome.

Yé-Atakilt Kilikil

  • Green beans, carrots, potatoes and onions cooked in a mild sauce; another good one.

Yé-Tikil Gomen

  • Fresh cabbages, carrots, potatoes and green pepper cooked in a turmeric sauce; cabbage is very musical too, hooray!

Vegetable Curry

  • Eggplants, squash, green and red peppers sautéed in a curry sauce; same deal with the sautéing.

Fasika totally works! I'd order either the Yé-Tikil Gomen or the Yé-Gomen Wot. In general, Ethiopian food is pretty rock star! Not a lot of frills and packed with vegetables.

But, Ethiopians do eat some funky stuff too. I saw on TV that they drink coffee with butter and salt. Yuck! Anyway, do me a favor. Flip through Fasika’s menu and tell what you’d order.

Image credit: Faskia Ethiopian Restaurant