Exercise Great After a Heart Attack, Period.

Whether you like weights or cardio, all exercise helps after a heart attack. Published in the journal Circulation, researchers enrolled 209 heart attack survivors in a four-week exercise routine including either a 10-minute warm-up followed by 40 minutes of cycling or 10 exercises with weights and rubber bands. At the end of the study the endothelial function of both groups, i.e. the amount blood vessels widen to increase blood flow, more than doubled, jumping from 4% to 10%; HealthDay News investigates.

And many health experts believe more exercise, coupled with better diet, would cut world cancer in half and other studies have linked aerobic fitness with appetite suppression and bone strength. For fun, mix up your workout! Maybe try Yoga it’s been associated with diabetes control, or Tai Chi which fights arthritis.

But don’t kill yourself! A recent report linked mental tiredness with quicker physical exhaustion. I blog a lot and I exercise a lot and if I don’t relax, I really feel it at the gym.

Image credit: Today is a good day

Men Should Add Impact Exercise for Strong Bones

New findings in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research suggest high-impact exercise, like running, helps keep bones strong in men. Scientists studied 42 athletic men, ages 19 to 45, and discovered running yielded bigger benefits for bone density than strengthen training, both runners and weight-lifters had higher bone density than road cyclists, weight-lifters had strong bones due to bigger muscles, but runners had even stronger bones, regardless of muscle size; Reuters reports.

In January, another study on cyclists showed despite having less body fat and more muscle, bike-riders had weaker bones and were 2.5 to 3 times more likely to develop osteoporosis. Researchers recommended adding running or weight-training. Not a bad idea, because in the U.S. the lifetime rate of bone fracture is 40% in 50-year-old women and over 13% in men, with 300,000 hip fractures each year.

Time for some shameless marketing! Strong bones need strong muscles. Muscles strength is directly related to bone density and in Dr. Fuhrman’s DVD Osteoporosis Protection for Life he demonstrates a bunch of bone-building exercises you can do at home and it’s a lot cheaper than a gym membership!

Flickr: jeremyh21

Osteoporosis Protection for Life!

You might not realize it, but osteoporosis is an epidemic, effecting 8 million American women and 2 million men, yes men can get it too, and causes 1.5 million bone fractures each year. Now, in his brand new DVD, Osteoporosis Protection for Life, Dr. Fuhrman discusses the causes of osteoporosis, offers prevention strategies, like nutrition and exercise, and dispels a lot of the misinformation about osteoporosis.

Like how drugs aren’t the answer. In January, a study came out linking the popular osteoporosis drug Fosamax with esophageal cancer. From October 2005 to May 2008, the FDA received 23 claims of patients being diagnosed with esophagus cancer and Fosamax is the suspect drug in 21 cases and the concomitant drug in 2. And previously, Fosamax and its generic alendronate were found to be associated with irregular heartbeat. Eek!

Then later in January, we learned not all exercise is created equal. Cyclists, despite being thin and fit, actually have more osteoporosis. That’s why researchers suggested bike-riders add running and weight-training to their workouts. Strong muscles mean strong bones and no hip fractures. Because just the other day a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association revealed mortality, i.e. death risk, after a hip fracture lasts for at least 10 years.

So, if broken hips, brittle bones and drug side effects aren’t your thing, give Osteoporosis Protection for Life a try. In it, Dr. Fuhrman also talks about how much calcium people need and the importance of getting vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin, what foods are loaded with calcium, such as Bok-choy and spinach, and for you fitness nuts, like me, Dr. Fuhrman demonstrates some funky exercises, like squat jumps, lunge walks and superman swim. It’s a bird, it’s a plane!

Okay, not to be all salesy, but if you’re a man or woman, or just a smart-alecky twenty-something like me, Osteoporosis Protection for Life could be a launching pad on your way to strong, healthy bones. No one wants to be a hunchback when they’re older—right?

Image credit: Drfuhrman.com

Cyclists May Have More Osteoporosis

You’ve probably heard it before. Exercise is really good for your bones. It makes them stronger. But a new study in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise claims cyclists were 2.5 to 3 times more likely to develop osteoporosis or near-osteoporosis. However, biker riders did have less body fat and more muscle. Adding running or weight lifting to a workout can help stimulate the bones and keep them strong; via KiroTV.

In other news, the osteoporosis drug Fosamax has been linked to esophageal cancer. And, getting plenty of vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin, is a great way to keep bones strong and healthy. So is using a weighted vest.

Image credit: semuthutan