Eating to Live on the Outside: Nile Ethiopian Restaurant

It’s Saturday. Time for the Eating to Live on the Outside road show. And today we’re “off” to Nile Ethiopian Restaurant in Virginia. How does it stack up? I like it. Here’s a quick list of stuff I might order.

Azifa

  • Whole lentils cooked and mashed, seasoned lime juice and mustard; lentils are awesome. Just make sure you don’t order lentils if you’re out on a date. Toot, toot!

Ater Kik Alicha

  • Yellow split peas cooked in mildly flavored sauce, seasoned with garlic and ginger; looks good to me. It’s hard to go wrong with garlic.

Gomen

  • Finely chopped collard green seasoned with garlic and ginger; collard greens are always a winner for me.

Tekel Gomen

  • Green cabbage seasoned with fresh garlic and ginger; cabbage is cool, just watch out for the toot-toots here too.

Fasolia

  • String beans and carrots cooked in a mild caramelized onion sauce; string beans are great. I like them when they’re a tad undercooked. They’re crispier that way.

Now, if I REALLY had to pick something. I’d go with the go with the Gomen. I eat collard greens a lot. So I’ll stick with the sure thing. What about you? What would you order? Check out Nile’s menu and let know.

Image credit: Nile Ethiopian Restaurant

Omega-3's May Save Your Eyesight

Go eat some walnuts! Because a new study in the British Journal of Ophthalmology claims diets rich in omega-3 fatty acids may slow the development of age-related macular degeneration. An analysis of nearly 3,000 people, randomly assigned to take three different vitamin supplements or a placebo, revealed no matter the supplement, participants with higher intake of omega-3’s were at lower risk for the progression of advanced macular degeneration; Reuters reports.

Flaxseeds are another powerful source of omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3’s are amazing! They’ve been linked to improved insulin tolerance, protection against prostate cancer and prevention of repeat strokes. Oh, and citrus fruits also help stave off age-related macular degeneration.

And last year, a report showed antioxidant carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, found in leafy green vegetables—such as collard greens, spinach and kale—promote eye health too.

Image credit: flora.cyclam

Eating to Live on the Outside: Fasika Ethiopian Restaurant

As a Yankees fan going to bean town is almost a sacrilege, but sometimes we all have to make sacrifices. This week Eating to Live on the Outside “travels” to Fasika in Boston, Massachusetts.

Baseball loyalties aside, Fasika looks like a great place to eat. They serve food made with a variety of vegetables, like collard greens, cabbage and eggplant. Here are some good choices:

Ethiopian Salad

  • Romaine lettuce, tomatoes, red onions and jalapeno peppers in lemon vinaigrette; nothing wrong with this, but I’d order the dressing on the side.

Azifa

  • Lentil salad with jalapeno peppers, onions and vinegar; looks cool.

Tegabino

  • Traditional sauce made from roasted legumes and Berbere; beans are great and musical too!

Yé-Misir Wot

  • Split lentils cooked in berbere sauce; no problems here.

Yé-kik Alicha

  • Split peas cooked in garlic and ginger sauce; I dig it.

Yé-Gomen Wot

  • Collard green leaves sautéed with onions and garlic; the sautéing is iffy, but the collard greens are awesome.

Yé-Atakilt Kilikil

  • Green beans, carrots, potatoes and onions cooked in a mild sauce; another good one.

Yé-Tikil Gomen

  • Fresh cabbages, carrots, potatoes and green pepper cooked in a turmeric sauce; cabbage is very musical too, hooray!

Vegetable Curry

  • Eggplants, squash, green and red peppers sautéed in a curry sauce; same deal with the sautéing.

Fasika totally works! I'd order either the Yé-Tikil Gomen or the Yé-Gomen Wot. In general, Ethiopian food is pretty rock star! Not a lot of frills and packed with vegetables.

But, Ethiopians do eat some funky stuff too. I saw on TV that they drink coffee with butter and salt. Yuck! Anyway, do me a favor. Flip through Fasika’s menu and tell what you’d order.

Image credit: Faskia Ethiopian Restaurant

Citrus Fruits Help Stave Off Vision Loss

Its not just citrus fruits, new findings in the journal Ophthalmology suggest older adults eating a lot of leafy greens, citrus fruits and fish are less likely to develop age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a major contributor to vision lose. Studying the diets of 4,000 adults, experts claim foods rich in omega-3s, vitamin C and E, zinc and antioxidants lower the risk of AMD. These low-sugar foods do not cause surges in blood pressure, which may harm retinas; Reuters reports.

Actually, last year researchers determined plant nutrients lutein and zeaxanthin, found in foods like spinach, kale and collard greens, promote eye health and prevent cataracts, while eating red meat 10 times week increases the likelihood of age-related macular degeneration by 47%.

In related news, a recent study showed vegetable-based diabetes offer superior diabetes control and omega-3 fatty acids, like those contained in walnuts, reduce inflammation linked to heart disease.

Image credit: Yannick .