Green-News: Wednesday 7.8.09

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Green-News: Wednesday 6.24.09

 

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Green-News: Tuesday 1.20.08

  • Sorry spring-breakers, tequila is not good for the environment. The region of Mexico, where tequila is made, cannot re-grow blue agave cactuses, tequila’s prime ingredient, fast enough. The blue agave takes 6 years to mature and increased production has made tequila unsustainable; from NewScientist.
  • Climate change whacks the environment. But it also harms human health. And not just from pollution. An epidemic of nephropathia epidemica, which can cause internal hemorrhaging and death, in Europe is being blamed on booming vermin populations, due to warming temperatures; ScienceDaily explains.
  • A group of major U.S. corporations, including 3 automakers, has announced a joint pact to reduce carbon emissions by 80% by 2050. A spokesperson for the coalition says America, has the will, the capabilities and the courage to eco-innovate, even in these tough economic times; via ENN.
  • The Environmental Protection Agency has settled a lawsuit over their failure to adequately monitor mercury emissions from cement plants. In 2007, a group of 9 states sued the EPA. As part of the settlement, the agency will now regulate cement plant mercury pollution; the Associated Press reports.
  • More bad news for the EPA, this time 6 environmental groups have sued the EPA over a rule that doesn’t require dairies and livestock farms to notify officials when harmful materials, like ammonia and hydrogen sulfide, found in cattle urine and feces, are released; the Associated Press investigates.

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Green-News: Tuesday 1.6.09

  • Every year tourists flock to New York City’s Times Square to ring in the New Year. But this year, after the 1 million guests went home and a ton of confetti was released, the city was stuck with 40 tons of garbage to clean up, sanitation crews worked until 8AM; the Associated Press reports.
  • Following the massive coal ash spill in East Tennessee, nearby water supplies have tested high for arsenic, lead, chromium and other toxic metals, ranging 2 to 300 times higher than acceptable drinking water standards, even as far as 2 miles downstream; The New York Times investigates.
  • A Swedish town is set to recycle heat from a local crematorium. Cremating human remains releases toxins, such as mercury from dental fillings, and in order to clean this gas it must first be cooled. So recovering this heat can be used to feed the public heating system; from TreeHugger.
  • Scientists have invented cement that absorbs earth-warming carbon dioxide. Traditional cement actually produces 5% of the world’s total carbon emissions. But this new formulation uses magnesium silicates and eats large amounts of carbon dioxide as it hardens; via The Guardian.
  • The Great Barrier Reef is dying. At the current pace, researchers fear all new growth will stop by 2050. Since 1990, robust corals have slowed in growth by 14%. Scientists cite warming sea temperatures and ocean acidification for the decline; The Sydney Morning Herald reports.

Green-News: Wednesday 12.10.08

  • A cruise ship has run aground on Antarctica's western peninsula. The passengers and crew were rescued but officials fear the vessel may be leaking unknown amounts of oil. This could cause long-lasting damage the pristine channel and local environment; via National Geographic News.

Green-News: Wednesday 12.3.08

  • Wind power might change the weather. Using a computer model, scientists determined a mega wind-farm from Texas to central Canada and the Great Lakes to the Rocky Mountains, on the average, lowered wind speeds by 2-3 meters per second; Discovery News investigates.
  • Our energy demands show no signs of slowing down. Leading researchers to believe that even if we switch to clean power, all the heat generated from our energy needs might still cause the planet to warm up, despite the reduction in greenhouse gases; NewScientist reports.
  • Rainforests soak up carbon emissions. But they’re being chopped down in order to grow biofuels. Here’s the problem, a new study has determined the benefit of using this land for biofuel wouldn’t show up for 75 years. Meaning forest conservation is more eco-friendly; TreeHugger explains.

Green-News: Tuesday 12.2.08