Eating to Live on the Outside: The Vegetable Garden

Happy Friday! Let’s go on a journey, a digital journey. Fire up the internet, we’re heading to The Vegetable Garden in Rockville, Maryland. And this place is loaded with veggie fare.

It took me awhile and several run-throughs to decide what I’d eat. So, after much deliberation, here’s of list of things I might order. Have a look:

Whole Wheat Steamed Dumplings

  • Wheat flour, green chard, carrots, firm tofu and rice vermicelli; the vermicelli is a little iffy, but the chard is cool.

Spinach Roll

  • Spinach, sesame and sesame dressing; rock on spinach!

Asparagus Seaweed Roll

  • Fresh asparagus, carrots, lettuce, sea salt and sesame dressing; skipping the salt, but everything else is fine.

Vegetable Garden Salad

  • Romaine lettuces, carrot, red cabbage, cucumber, grape tomato, red bell peppers, green bell peppers, roasted pine nuts, mandarin orange, dried cranberries and rice vinegar dressing; I’d get the dressing on the side.

Mugwort Soba Noodle Salad

  • Wheat flour, buckwheat flour, sea salt, mugwort leaves, organic radicchio, organic cabbage, organic Romaine lettuce, organic carrots, organic maple syrup, organic marukan rice vinegar, black-pepper, roasted sesame seed, roasted sliced almond and virgin olive oil; I’ll ditch the salt and ask for the oil on the side.
Asparagus with Oyster Mushroom
  • Yuba, oyster mushroom, asparagus and brown sauce; I’d ask about the brown sauce, the asparagus is awesome.

Eight Treasure Eggplant

  • Dried eggplant, shitake mushrooms, yellow squash, zucchini, red bell pepper, lily bulb, pine nuts, dried cranberries, cashew nuts, firm tofu and spicy sauce; just ask about the sauce, otherwise a ton of veggies!

Bamboo Raft

  • Marinated yuba, celery, carrots, asparagus, shiitake mushrooms, jicama, steamed green cabbage leaves, curry and coconut milk sauce; go easy on the sauce.

Lo Hen Cantaloupe

  • Yuba, cucumber celery, butternut squash, jicama, cantaloupe, black mushrooms, pecans, cashews, dried cranberries, curry and coconut sauce; same deal, watch the sauce.

Pearl Squash

  • Butternut squash, fresh lily bulb, ginger, red bell peppers, beets and light black bean sauce; watch that sauce again.

Jian Pao Vegi-Gourmet

  • Asparagus, firm tofu, lily bulb, sugar snap peas, oyster mushroom, yellow squash, red bell pepper and spicy sauce; yup, again with the sauce.

Bean Nest

  • Red kidney beans, chic peas, baby lima, lentil, adzuki beans, pinto beans, black soy beans and brown sauce; all those beans, I wonder what will happen.

Alright, that is a lot of food to choose from. I mean come on! Now, as for my exact order, I’d either get the Vegetable Garden Salad, Bean Nest or any number of the veggie rolls.

I give The Vegetable Garden the seal of approval, but what about you? Check out their menu and let me know how you handle Eating to Live on the Outside.

Image credit: The Vegetable Garden

Eating to Live on the Outside: Lotus Vegan Restaurant

Hey, it’s Friday, time for Eating to Live on the Outside. This week, via the Internet, we’re visiting Lotus Vegan Restaurant, in California. And quite frankly, its looks REALLY good!

Tons of cool stuff, like sprouts, beets, lentils, pineapple and avocado. I love avocado! Alright, here’s ALL the stuff I liked. Take a look:

Fresh Rolls

  • Rice noodles, Romaine lettuce, basil leaves, beans, carrots, sprouts and vegan house sauce; pretty good, rice noodles are iffy, you could ditch them, but everything else is cool.

Vegetable Soup

  • Thai vegan soup, with broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, peas, Napa cabbage, onion, zucchini and celery; might be salty, but LOTS of great stuff!

Hot & Sour Vegetable Soup

  • Savory sour soup with lemon grass, Kaffir lime leaves, lime juice, broccoli, cauliflower, Napa cabbage, carrots, zucchini and celery; again with the salt, but sounds yummy.

Cucumber Salad

  • Sliced cucumbers, red onions, bell peppers and dressing; sounds good, I’d order the dressing on the side.

Thai Salad

  • Fresh greens, grilled tofu, Romaine lettuce, onions, tomatoes, cucumbers, bell peppers and light peanut dressing; same deal, dressing on the side.

High Protein Salad

  • Garden fresh greens, edamame beans, avocado, Romaine lettuce, tomatoes, red onions and peanut dressing; sounds good to me!

Garden Salad

  • Romaine lettuce, Napa cabbage, carrots, onions, garlic, beets, cucumber, bean sprouts, grilled shiitake mushrooms, tofu, silvers noodle and seasoning; no noodles for me, otherwise its cool.

Dinner Salad

  • Romaine lettuce, carrots, alfalfa sprouts, tomatoes and cucumbers; no problems here!

Mystery Stir Fried Vegetable

  • Tofu, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, red bell peppers, celery, bean sprouts, onions, zucchini and seasonings; yeah, the fried part stinks, but all the veggies are awesome.

Lentil Loaf

  • Grilled lentil with brown rice, onions, bell peppers and seasoning; the rice is iffy, but it’s interesting.

Spicy Eggplant

  • Chinese eggplant, sautéed in chili sauce, onions, bell peppers and basil leaves; the sautéed part is bad, but I can deal with it.

Spicy Mint Leaves

  • Fresh mint leaves and chili, sautéed with garlic, onions and bell peppers; same thing here.

Sweet & Sour

  • Sautéed pineapple chunks with cucumber, tomatoes, onions, bell peppers and sweet and sour sauce; again, same deal.

Broccoli

  • Broccoli sautéed with Thai vegan gravy sauce; I love broccoli.

Cashew Nuts

  • Roasted cashews sautéed with onions, bell peppers, carrots, green onion, celery and water chestnuts; I’m digging it.

Lentil Burger

  • Lentil patty made with brown rice, onions, red bell peppers and cilantro; the rice might scare you, but lentils are really good. The bun is a concession.

Mushroom Burger

  • Lentil loaf with mushrooms; again, the bun might be a turnoff.

Grilled Veggie Burger

  • Sautéed zucchini, eggplant, red bell peppers, mushrooms and onions; I really like zucchini!

Lentil Wrap

  • Avocado, lentils, lettuce, tomato, alfalfa sprouts and whole wheat lavash; the bread might scare you, but avocado is rock star.

Fajita Wrap

  • Sautéed onion, eggplant, bell peppers, zucchini, lettuce, tomato and pepper; again, the wrap and sautéing might worry you.

The curry looks good too. Provided you stick with the vegetable options and not the mock duck. Also, try ordering a bunch of sides. I like the steamed veggies and lentil loaf. But overall, my pick is the High Protein Salad.

In the end, Lotus looks very doable. I dig it, my kind of place. But what do you think? Check out Lotus’s menu and let know how you handle Eating to Live on the Outside.
 

Image credit: Lotus Vegan Restaurant

Eat Foods That Fill You Up - Volume, Volume, Volume!

Our hunger drive craves volume. A key skill that you are developing for your health is the ability to eat large volumes of raw and cooked, high-nutrient, low-calorie foods every single day. This means eating lots of vegetables.

When you are actively trying to lose weight, you should strive to satisfy your volume requirements first, before addressing the other dimensions of hunger. This may feel strange at first because you may not immediately feel satisfied by the higher volume of food. This is because you are accustomed to eating large quantities of high-calorie foods that cause a dopamine rush, a rush that low-calorie foods don’t deliver. However, your body will adjust, be less dependent on the dopamine surge in the brain, and will gradually become more and more satisfied with fewer calories. Give yourself time, and use the knowledge you have gained. Striving to fulfill your body’s volume and nutrient requirements can help you resolve food cravings and your toxic hunger.

The trick to get you to desire fewer calories faster is to eat lots of these high-volume, high-nutrient foods. You are already familiar with these, but many of the foods that you have been incorporating into your diet because of their nutrient values are also great tools in meeting your volume requirements. They include:

  • Raw Vegetables: lettuce, tomatoes, peppers, celery, anise, snow pea pods, carrots, beets, cucumbers, water chestnuts, red cabbage, onion
  • Most Fresh Fruits: melons, oranges, grapefruits, apples, kiwis, berries, papaya
  • Cooked Green Vegetables: Brussels sprouts, string beans, artichokes, asparagus, broccoli, Chinese cabbage, bok choy
  • Other Non-Green Vegetables: mushrooms, eggplant, sun-dried tomatoes, onions, bean sprouts, cauliflower, spaghetti squash

Especially on holidays and days when you know that you will be around a lot of unhealthy foods, pre-fill with these high-nutrient, low-calorie foods. Never go to a party or event with an empty stomach. Eat a large salad with assorted raw vegetables and a bowl of vegetable soup before going to the places that may tempt your desire to eat unhealthily. Being healthy is about being in control. You must control your hunger, and the more low-calorie, high-volume foods you consume, the less high-calorie food you will be able to eat. When you increase these super healthy foods in your diet, you will feel less temptation, and you will be in control of your food cravings and appetite.

This is an excerpt from Dr. Fuhrman’s book Eat For Health.

 

CSA Boxed Share 8.17.09

Yesterday was interesting, just look at that bizarre mutant tomato! I think it’s related to Swamp Thing. But the rest of the box share was pretty tame: basil, lettuce, parsley, zucchini, squash, green peppers, purple peppers, garlic, potatoes, cabbage, eggplant, hot peppers and more tomatoes. All good stuff!

 

CSA Boxed Share 8.10.09

Ugh! It hardly feels like summer this year with all the rain we've been having. If it wasn’t for my CSA box shares I think I’d pack up shop and move to California. Luckily, this week was a good haul. It cheered me up a bit.

As you can see, I got a whole box of tomatoes, plus cherry tomatoes, cabbage, corn, shallots, green bell peppers, garlic, potatoes, zucchini and yellow squash. After I split it with my buddy, I took home half the tomatoes, some potatoes, the squash, a few shallots and the garlic. Sweet!

Eating to Live on the Outside: Nile Ethiopian Restaurant

It’s Saturday. Time for the Eating to Live on the Outside road show. And today we’re “off” to Nile Ethiopian Restaurant in Virginia. How does it stack up? I like it. Here’s a quick list of stuff I might order.

Azifa

  • Whole lentils cooked and mashed, seasoned lime juice and mustard; lentils are awesome. Just make sure you don’t order lentils if you’re out on a date. Toot, toot!

Ater Kik Alicha

  • Yellow split peas cooked in mildly flavored sauce, seasoned with garlic and ginger; looks good to me. It’s hard to go wrong with garlic.

Gomen

  • Finely chopped collard green seasoned with garlic and ginger; collard greens are always a winner for me.

Tekel Gomen

  • Green cabbage seasoned with fresh garlic and ginger; cabbage is cool, just watch out for the toot-toots here too.

Fasolia

  • String beans and carrots cooked in a mild caramelized onion sauce; string beans are great. I like them when they’re a tad undercooked. They’re crispier that way.

Now, if I REALLY had to pick something. I’d go with the go with the Gomen. I eat collard greens a lot. So I’ll stick with the sure thing. What about you? What would you order? Check out Nile’s menu and let know.

Image credit: Nile Ethiopian Restaurant

CSA Boxed Share 8.4.09

Despite the rainy, depressing weather, yesterday’s box share brightened up my day. Tomatoes are one of my favorite vegetables, so I was stoked when I found two containers of cherry tomatoes, along with regular tomatoes, corn, cabbage, basil, shallots, zucchini, garlic, potatoes and onions.

Now, until my garbage tomato starts bearing fruit—no doubt it’s been delayed by the unseasonably cool summer—I’ll have to make do with these tomatoes. Okay, so after the split with my friend I got some potatoes, shallots, corn, onions, zucchini and of course tomatoes. Sweet!

 

CSA Boxed Share 7.20.09

The CSA gods were good to me again this week. My box share did not disappoint. Yesterday we got red potatoes, red leaf lettuce, scallions, garlic, zucchini, cucumbers, red cabbage, tomatoes and basil. Splitting it with my friend was hard, but we managed.

After a brief fist fight—mind you, she is 9 months pregnant—we divided up the potatoes, scallions, tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchini and lettuce and I kept the red cabbage. She took the garlic and the basil. I’m Italian. My mom grows enough basil to feed an army.

 

CSA Boxed Share 7.6.09

I always get excited when I pick up my share for the week and the box is heavy—means there’s a bunch of cool stuff inside. Although, it’s pretty funny to watch a big tattooed galoot like me carrying a box of organic veggies around and then taking pictures of it like a mental patient.

Now, this week was packed with goodies. There was red leaf lettuce, kale, zucchini, cabbage, garlic, beets, fennel, onions, cucumbers and a flying saucer-looking gourd of some sort. I usually give the beets to my mom. It’s funny to watch her get ticked that they stain her hands. I’m evil.

Vegetarians Have Less Cancer Risk than Meat-Eaters -- UPDATE --

New findings in the British Journal of Cancer reveal of the 60,000 Britons studied those who were vegetarian—half of them—had a lower risk of developing cancer, compared to meat-eaters. The research followed participants for 12.2 years, with 3,350 incidences of cancer. The number of meat-ears who developed cancer was 2,204 and 829 among vegetarians—only 317 fish-eaters got cancer. Overall, vegetarians were 12% less likely to get cancer; Medical News Today reports.

But vegetarian and vegan diets most often aren’t ideal. Dr. Fuhrman points out many vegans and vegetarians are often deficient in things like omega-3’s, found in fish. Dr. Fuhrman’s DHA Purity can help. It’s derived from microalgae and supplies plenty of brain-building omega–3 fatty acids.

In related news, animal fat was shown to raise the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, while leafy green vegetables—such as kale and cabbage—help fight and protect against cancer.

UPDATE: Dr. Fuhrman had some additional thoughts: 

A vegan diet can be ideal if well designed as can be a diet with a small amount of animal products, such as one or two servings a week. A nutritarian diet is designed to reverse disease and promote longer life, and features:

  • Adequate depth and variety of nutrient-rich natural foods
  • Limited animal products, but adequate ALA/EPA/DHA
  • Adequate whole food plant fats and proteins from seeds, nuts and beans
  • High intake of green and cruciferous vegetables
  • Careful attention to supplements or lab tests to assure no deficiencies are present with genetic variation of absorption and variable needs

Image credit: Carly & Art