Nice Weather Shortcut

I’ve discovered a great way to quickly store my garden bounty without spending much time in the kitchen during the final days of gorgeous summer weather.

I harvested all the ripe tomatoes plus the zucchinis that I let grow “too big”; the kind that master gardeners would most likely throw onto their compost piles.

After rinsing the vegetables with water, I cut the tops off the tomatoes and quartered them. Then I sliced the huge zucchinis into 2 inch cross-sections, and chopped them into chunks; skin, seeds and all.

I had enough to fill two, five gallon stock pots. I then turned on the stove burners and put on the lids. I didn’t add spices, onions, garlic or anything, and just allowed the tomatoes to break down and make their own juice in the cooking process.

When the zucchinis and tomatoes were thoroughly cooked and tender, I turned off the stove, removed the lids, and allowed everything to cool. When cooled, I put the stewed vegetables into one-gallon zippered bags and stored them flat in the freezer. They look like a bunch of stacked books.

Now I can pull out a one gallon “book” of cooked tomatoes and zucchinis, cut the plastic bag off, place it in a stock pot, and use it as a base for almost anything.

For starters, this past week I made a batch of bean and vegetable soup; adding onions, garlic, Mato Zest, previously cooked lentils and garbanzo beans, fresh cut corn, and a frozen bag of each: collard greens, green beans and brussel sprouts. It was delicious! For my family I added a little bit of cooked, ground turkey and they absolutely loved it! (In another post I’ll tell how I gradually transitioned my family into eating nutrient dense foods.)

I’m almost ready to rip the tomato plants out, till the soil under, and start planting my kale and spinach seeds for the fall and winter harvest.

Here’s to eating for health to all!

Do you have a harvesting short cut to share?

Eat Foods That Fill You Up - Volume, Volume, Volume!

Our hunger drive craves volume. A key skill that you are developing for your health is the ability to eat large volumes of raw and cooked, high-nutrient, low-calorie foods every single day. This means eating lots of vegetables.

When you are actively trying to lose weight, you should strive to satisfy your volume requirements first, before addressing the other dimensions of hunger. This may feel strange at first because you may not immediately feel satisfied by the higher volume of food. This is because you are accustomed to eating large quantities of high-calorie foods that cause a dopamine rush, a rush that low-calorie foods don’t deliver. However, your body will adjust, be less dependent on the dopamine surge in the brain, and will gradually become more and more satisfied with fewer calories. Give yourself time, and use the knowledge you have gained. Striving to fulfill your body’s volume and nutrient requirements can help you resolve food cravings and your toxic hunger.

The trick to get you to desire fewer calories faster is to eat lots of these high-volume, high-nutrient foods. You are already familiar with these, but many of the foods that you have been incorporating into your diet because of their nutrient values are also great tools in meeting your volume requirements. They include:

  • Raw Vegetables: lettuce, tomatoes, peppers, celery, anise, snow pea pods, carrots, beets, cucumbers, water chestnuts, red cabbage, onion
  • Most Fresh Fruits: melons, oranges, grapefruits, apples, kiwis, berries, papaya
  • Cooked Green Vegetables: Brussels sprouts, string beans, artichokes, asparagus, broccoli, Chinese cabbage, bok choy
  • Other Non-Green Vegetables: mushrooms, eggplant, sun-dried tomatoes, onions, bean sprouts, cauliflower, spaghetti squash

Especially on holidays and days when you know that you will be around a lot of unhealthy foods, pre-fill with these high-nutrient, low-calorie foods. Never go to a party or event with an empty stomach. Eat a large salad with assorted raw vegetables and a bowl of vegetable soup before going to the places that may tempt your desire to eat unhealthily. Being healthy is about being in control. You must control your hunger, and the more low-calorie, high-volume foods you consume, the less high-calorie food you will be able to eat. When you increase these super healthy foods in your diet, you will feel less temptation, and you will be in control of your food cravings and appetite.

This is an excerpt from Dr. Fuhrman’s book Eat For Health.

 

Obesity in Early Adulthood Linked to Pancreatic Cancer

Yeah, don’t get fat. New findings in the Journal of the American Medical Association show having a high body mass index in early adulthood may raise the risk of pancreatic cancer. The study involved 841 pancreatic cancer patients and 752 cancer-free people, with participants asked to recall their height and weight at ages 14 to 19 and in their 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s and 70s. Data found individuals who were overweight at 14 to 19 and in their 30s had a 60% higher risk of pancreatic cancer, but risk seemed to level off after age 40; ScienceDaily explains.

You can keep that risk down with diet. A previous report found eating green veggies like broccoli, cabbage and Brussels sprouts helps fight pancreatic cancer. While charred or barbequed meat raises the risk of pancreatic cancer, due to cancer-causing heterocyclic amines.

In related news, obesity heightens women’s risk of pancreatic cancer. In some cases, as high as 70%, which worries researchers because obesity is largely a preventable problem.

Image credit: kreg.steppe

Britons Choke Down Healthy Food...

Many Brits love a full English breakfast, but hate nutritious foods, like spinach, mushrooms, lentils, onions, Brussels sprouts, broccoli and other vegetables. But, they still eat them! According to a new report, during their lifetime, people living in the United Kingdom consume 4,000 portions of foods they dislike, because they know eating them is healthy. Nutritionists are astonished by the amount of food people are forcing themselves to eat; The Telegraph investigates.

Wow, that’s hardcore! But not nearly as tough as the mums who started dealing hamburgers on the playground when the local school tried to improve its menu, now that’s gangster!

Via CalorieLab.

Image credit: riffraff1