I Can Has Swiss Chard!

I consider myself a rough and tough guy, but I got to be honest. I love kitties! And I’m addicted to I Can Has Cheez Burger. In addition to ALL the news I read everyday, I’m a regular visitor of the site. I suspect many of you are too. So when I saw this picture. I freaked.

It’s certainly better than when your cat leaves a disemboweled mouse on your front steps. Now, this frisky feline isn’t the only vegetable loving cat we’ve found. This little guy goes crazy for baby spinach and this tuxedo cat just can’t get enough broccoli. Nom, nom, nom!

Via I Can has Cheez Burger.

 

Image credit: ICanHasCheezBurger.com

CSA Boxed Share 6.29.09

Okay, I’ve decided for the rest of summer I am going to ditch my search for marked down fruits and vegetables and—in the spirit of the season—blog about all the cool stuff I get from my local community supported agriculture. Sound like a good idea? I think so.

As you can see, yesterday’s box was loaded with awesome vegetables. After I split it up with my friend, I was left with the broccoli, radicchio, lettuce, fennel and some onions and garlic. Not a bad haul, but I have a busy week ahead of me, so I gave most of it to my mom.

Obesity in Early Adulthood Linked to Pancreatic Cancer

Yeah, don’t get fat. New findings in the Journal of the American Medical Association show having a high body mass index in early adulthood may raise the risk of pancreatic cancer. The study involved 841 pancreatic cancer patients and 752 cancer-free people, with participants asked to recall their height and weight at ages 14 to 19 and in their 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s and 70s. Data found individuals who were overweight at 14 to 19 and in their 30s had a 60% higher risk of pancreatic cancer, but risk seemed to level off after age 40; ScienceDaily explains.

You can keep that risk down with diet. A previous report found eating green veggies like broccoli, cabbage and Brussels sprouts helps fight pancreatic cancer. While charred or barbequed meat raises the risk of pancreatic cancer, due to cancer-causing heterocyclic amines.

In related news, obesity heightens women’s risk of pancreatic cancer. In some cases, as high as 70%, which worries researchers because obesity is largely a preventable problem.

Image credit: kreg.steppe

CSA Boxed Share 6.22.09

For the first time ever, I didn’t find any marked down fruits and veggies, but I’m a resourceful little bugger. A couple weeks ago my community supported agriculture started up again. So this week, instead of cheap manager’s special produce, let’s see what’s inside my box share.

A whole bunch of cool stuff! I got lots of broccoli and zucchinis, tons of lettuce and radicchio, some garlic tops, little bit of kale and a nice fat Napa cabbage. I split the share with my friend. So I kept the kale, a couple broccolis, lettuce, a zucchini and a few garlic tops. Nice!

On Manager's Special 6.15.09

A bunch of broccoli $0.67.

 

Some more broccoli $0.39.

 

Different kinds of apples $1.71.

 

Today's grand total is only $2.77. I can't go for more than a day without eating broccoli. I crave it!

Cancer Alert: Your Best Defense - Go Cruciferous

We may not have eaten so healthfully our entire lives. We may have a family history of breast, prostate or colon cancer. What should we do? Just wait until cancer is found?

Getting medical screenings is certainly a personal decision, but if you want to know what you can really do to protect yourself—eat lots of colorful vegetables, specifically including lots of green cruciferous vegetables. Eating a diet rich in cruciferous vegetables is your best defense for fighting and preventing cancer.

If we really want to win the war against cancer, we must improve the nutritional quality of our diet. We have all heard about the antioxidant effects our bodies derive from the phytochemicals in plant foods. However, the unique phytochemicals found in cruciferous vegetables offer superior benefits. Cruciferous vegetables contain phytochemicals that have unique abilities to modify human hormones, detoxify compounds, and prevent toxic compounds from binding to human DNA, preventing toxins from causing DNA damage that could lead to cancer. Studies have even shown that genetic defects that may lead to cancer are suppressed by the consumption of green cruciferous vegetables.

Certainly, many studies have shown that eating fresh fruits, beans, vegetables, seeds, and nuts reduces the occurrence of cancer. I plotted cancer incidence in 25 countries against unrefined plant food intake and found that as vegetables, beans, and fruit consumption goes up 20% in a population, cancer rates typically drop 20%. But cruciferous vegetables are different; they have been shown to be twice as effective. As cruciferous vegetable intake goes up 20%, in a population, cancer rates drop 40%.

Great choices include: arugula, bok choy, broccoli, broccoli rabe, brocollina, brussels sprouts cabbage, cauliflower, collards, horseradish, kale, kohlrabi, mustard greens, radish, red cabbage, rutabaga, turnips, turnip greens and watercress.

Include them in both raw and cooked forms and eat a variety of them. These benefits cannot be duplicated by taking any one pre-formed compound or supplement.

The evidence is now overwhelming that cruciferous vegetables play a major and unique role in the widely recognized protective effects of natural plant foods against cancer—and are the most important players in this arena. The biologically active compounds from raw and conservatively cooked green vegetables enhance the natural defenses of the human body against DNA damage and they even fuel the body's ability to block growth and replication of cells that are already damaged. For those in the know, these foods are the most important nutritional factors to prevent common human cancers.

Read more about Cruciferous Vegetables—what they are and how they benefit us along with the studies that support these claims—in the July 2007 Healthy Times Newsletter plus get great-tasting cruciferous-rich recipes!

Selected References

Michaud DS, Spiegelman D, Clinton SK. Fruit and vegetable intake and incidence of bladder cancer in a male prospective cohort. J Natl Cancer Inst 1999; 91(7):605-13.

Link LB, Potter JD. Raw versus cooked vegetables and cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2004;13(9):1422-35.

Miller AB. Nutritional aspects of human carcinogenesis. IARC Sci Publ 1982;(39):177-92.

Higdon JV, Delage B, Williams DE, Dashwood RH. Cruciferous vegetables and human cancer risk: epidemiologic evidence and mechanistic basis. Pharmacol Res. 2007; 55(3):224-36.

Steinmetz KA, Potter JD. Vegetables, fruit, and cancer prevention: a review. J Am Diet Assoc 1996 Oct;96(10):1027-1039.

Lee SA, Fowke JH, Lu W. Cruciferous vegetables, the GSTP1 Ile105Val genetic polymorphism, and breast cancer risk. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008; 87(3):753-60.

Rose P, Huang Q, Ong CN, Whiteman M. Broccoli and watercress suppress matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity and invasiveness of human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 2005(10);S0041-008X.

Johnston N. Sulforaphane halts breast cancer cell growth. Drug Discov Today 2004;9(21):908.

Srivastava SK, Xiao D, Lew KL, et al. Allyl isothiocyanate, a constituent of cruciferous vegetables, inhibits growth of PC-3 human prostate cancer xenografts in vivo. Carcinogenesis 2003 Oct;24(10):1665-1670.

Finley JW. The antioxidant responsive element (ARE) may explain the protective effects of cruciferous vegetables on cancer. Nutr Rev 2003 Jul;61(7):250-254.

Seow A, Yuan JM, Sun CL, et al. Dietary isothiocyanates, glutathione S-transferase polymorphisms and colorectal cancer risk in the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Carcinogenesis 2002 Dec;23(12):2055-206.

Image credit: jennconspiracy

Less Meat, More Veggies Prevents Prostate Cancer

New research in the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics reveals diets low in fat and red meat and rich in fruits and vegetables helps prevent and treat prostate cancer. Using an evidence-based review of dietary recommendations, researchers found avoiding processed or charcoaled meats and dairy products and eating more tomatoes, broccoli and cauliflower has beneficial effects on prostate cancer prevention and treatment; Wiley-Blackwell reports.

According Dr. Fuhrman, humans are designed to consume a lot of plants and these foods are essential to preventing disease, such as prostate cancer. Recently, the World Cancer Research Fund said better diets, i.e. fruits and vegetables, could help curb global cancer rates.

In April, experts found pomegranate juice helps slow prostate cancer doubling times and omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to slash prostate cancer risk by as high as 63%.

Image credit: Dayna McIsaac

On Manager's Special 5.26.09

Some cut up broccoli $1.00.

 

Six big kohlrabi bulbs $1.99.

 

And four cucumbers $1.00.

 

Today's total, only $3.99. It’s pretty cool when you find something exotic like kohlrabi on the cheap.

On Manager's Special 5.18.09

A few bunches of broccoli, only $1.25.

 

A whole bunch of European pears $1.25.

 

Some ripe bananas $1.25.

 

And today's total is $3.75. No too bad, but weird that they were all the same price, maybe its a dark omen.

Rocking Out to Food Safety!

Food safety is a serious matter. Between salmonella and E. coli, we’ve got our hands full, but that doesn’t mean we can’t rock and roll! Check out Salmonella and the Pathogens belting out a silly version of "Heartache Tonight” by The Eagles:

 

 

I’m an Eagles fan, so my heart is with the original, but food music is pretty popular nowadays. For example, this funny looking guy can make wind instruments out of carrots, asparagus and broccoli. Clearly, he has way too much time on his hands.

Via SeriousEats.

Image credit: foodsafetymusic