Breastfeeding Cuts Breast Cancer Risk

According to a new study in the Archives of Internal Medicine, mothers reduce their risk of breast cancer—even if they have family history—by breast feeding. However, researchers aren’t sure why.

Why breastfeeding reduces risk of breast cancer is unknown. The authors suspect that when women do not breastfeed, inflammation and engorgement shortly after birth causes changes in breast tissue that may increase risk for breast cancer. Breastfeeding followed by weaning may prevent this inflammation.

When the researchers compared data about women who breastfed and those who did not, there was a 25 percent total reduction in incidence of premenopausal breast cancer. But, Alison Stuebe, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine and lead author of the study, says, that statistic was accounted for by women without a family history of the disease.

“We did not find an association between breastfeeding and premenopausal breast cancer among women without a family history of breast cancer,” Stuebe says. “This could be because there’s something about genetically caused breast cancer that’s affected by breastfeeding, or it could be because rates of breast cancer were so low in women without a family history that we couldn’t see an association in this data set.”

Dr. Fuhrman is a big advocate of breastfeeding, but—in regard to recent news about children’s lack of vitamin D—he suggests breastfeeding mothers still give their kids a vitamin D supplement.

Via Newswise.

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Breastfeeding Cuts Moms' Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke

Good news mommies. New findings in the upcoming May issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology claim mothers who breastfed were 10% percent less likely to develop heart disease or suffer a stroke than women who had never breastfed. The study, which involved nearly 140,000 postmenopausal women, also showed women who breastfed for at least one month had less diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol; from EurekAlert!

The benefits of breastfeeding are innumerable. Previous reports pin breastfeeding to breast cancer prevention, less likelihood of children becoming obese and reduced risk of allergies. Last year, it was reported 77% of new moms are breastfeeding. Not too shabby.

But some breastfeeding news can be icky. A Swiss restaurant was told no, they can’t serve human breast milk. Although, the story about the Chinese cop who breastfed infants in need during the rescue effort following last year’s deadly earthquake is heartwarming.

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Omega-3 DHA Revs Up Heart Health in Men

New findings in the Journal of Nutrition claim supplementing with omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may lower inflammation in men with elevated levels of triglycerides (hyperrtriglyceridaemia). Participants, 34 men with hyperrtriglyceridaemia, ages 39 to 66, were given a placebo or DHA supplement for 45 days. Results showed DHA decreased the levels of circulating white blood cells, down 11.7%, and these reductions continued until the end of the 90-day study; via Nutraingredients.

In January, a study determined infants of breastfeeding mothers taking a DHA supplement scored better on development tests and had less mental delay. Makes sense, Dr. Fuhrman lists a host of mental problems associated with deficiency in DHA fatty acids, such as depression and dyslexia.

Time for some shameless promotion! Hey, it’s relevant. Dr. Fuhrman sells his own DHA supplement. It’s derived from micro algae, is free of environmental contaminants and is 100% vegan.

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Asthma: Fast Food Negates Breastfeeding

A new study in Clinical and Experimental Allergy claims eating fast food once or twice a week negates the beneficial effects of breastfeeding. Fast food is becoming more pervasive in young children’s diets. So, scientists examined kids with or without asthma and found breastfeeding for too short of a time increased asthma-risk and kids breastfed for less than 3 months and ate a lot of fast food had an even higher risk; via The University of Alberta.

Listen, there’s no reason to eat fast food. But breastfeeding is important. In Disease-Proof Your Child, Dr. Fuhrman explains breast milk transfers important antibodies from mother to baby, which reduces risk of asthma and helps maximize intelligence.

Burgers and fries spread like locusts! In the Mediterranean, fast food is feeding an epidemic of heart disease, cancer and obesity.

Via The Daily Green.

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DHA Helps Brain Development of Premature Girls

A new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association reveals increased DHA intake in premature babies improved the neurodevelopment of girls. Scientists gave breastfeeding mothers a DHA supplement or a placebo. The breast milk of the supplement group had .85% concentration of total fatty acids. The placebo group was only .25%. Researchers also tested two varieties of baby formula, one with a 1.1% concentration of total fatty acids and the other with 0.42%. At 18 months, infants were given standard developmental tests and those on high DHA diets scored 5 points higher than infants on a normal DHA diet and had less mental delay; via Martek Biosciences Corporation.

DHA or docosahexaenoic acid is an essential nutrient for optimal brain. Our brains are 50% fat! And children's diets are notoriously low in short-chain omega-3 fatty acids, which the body converts into DHA. DHA deficiency has been linked to dyslexia, depression, schizophrenia and other mental disorders. But according to Dr. Fuhrman, most people can make sufficient DHA from omega-3 fats. Omega-3s are found in walnuts, flax seeds, green vegetables, algae and fish that eat the algae.

And Dr. Fuhrman sells his own DHA supplement called DHA Purity. It’s veggie-derived, made from microalgae. Microalgae refers to phytoplankton, microphytes and planktonic algae.

Image credit: Eimper.Blogspot.com

Breastfeeding Helps Kids' Lungs...

In the past, research has shown breastfeeding can increase children’s IQ, decrease risk of obesity and release happiness hormones in babies. And now, a new study in Thorax has determined children who are breastfed for at least 4 months have better lung function than children breastfed for shorter periods and then given a bottle; Reuters investigates.

Dr. Fuhrman advocates breastfeeding until age 2. This allows plenty of time for the mother’s antibodies to be passed along to her child. These nutrients are necessary for proper immune system function, maximizing intelligence and protecting against cancer, like breast cancer.

But sometimes breastfeeding can go berserk, like this crazy restaurant that cooked with human breast milk. Very gross!

Fear of Nuts, Hysteria!

Breastfeeding is strong medicine! Breast milk provides babies with necessary antibodies that help ward off allergies and boost immune systems and Dr. Fuhrman blames the decrease in breastfeeding for the rise in allergies among young children.

And now, a new study in the British Medical Journal claims the fear of nut allergies is becoming overblown. Researchers suggest the food industry’s restrictions and warnings about nuts, however well intentioned, are fueling the hysteria.

Especially since a previous study in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology shows despite 69% of Israeli children eating nuts and only 10% of British children consuming nuts, kids in the U.K. were 10 times more likely to have peanut allergies; FoodNavigator reports.

Clearly, there is another factor at play here and not just nuts themselves.
 

Autumn Ups Asthma Risk...

A new study in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine claims babies born in the fall have a 30% greater risk of developing asthma than babies born at some other time. Researchers blame winter viruses, like respiratory syncytial virus; HealthDay News reports.

And a previous report suggests over-stressed moms can increase their baby’s likelihood of developing asthma or allergies later in life. So can public swimming pools. But according to Dr. Fuhrman breastfeeding reduces the risk of asthma in children. It works in mice too!