Green-News: Wednesday 6.24.09

 

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Green-News: Wednesday 5.13.09

  • Canada is pushing towards biofeuls too, in this case ethanol, but the move is drawing concern from other countries, like the United States. To make ethanol, you need a lot of grain and there is controversy over the greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural practices used to raise feedstock grain; from ReportonBuisiness.com.

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Green-News: Wednesday 5.6.09

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Green-News: Thursday 2.5.09

  • A waste management company in the U.K. has invented a garbage truck that runs on fuel made out of trash collected from 25 bins installed around Northern England. The rubbish charges the truck’s battery and provides 10 megawatts of excess electricity to the grid. But, the trash is burned; DiscoBlog reports.
  • Gas prices have gone down, but more and more people are still looking to carpool. Massachusetts has implemented a state-wide system to promote car-pooling and the number of applicants doubled last year and in Germany, over 700,000 citizens use an online ride-share program; TreeHugger explains.

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Green-News: Thursday 1.29.09

  • Experts fear global warming could create dead zones in the ocean, carbon dioxide-heavy ecosystems devoid of sea life, and these pockets of environmental inactivity could last for up to two millennia. Runoff from agriculture is already causing dead zones; the AFP explains.
  • Using available acreage for growing biofuel crops might exacerbate global food shortages and push up prices. That’s why South Korean scientists have developed a way to use marine algae or seaweed to produce ethanol, instead occupying land; NewScientist investigates.
  • The green industry could fire up the U.S. economy. In California, green-collar jobs are on the rise. Improved efficiency standards have created 1.5 million jobs over the last three decades, such as wind-energy technicians and solar panel installers; The Los Angeles Times reports.

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Green-News: Thursday 12.18.08

  • This year the Vatican will recycle its Christmas tree. At 33 meters, it’s the tallest tree ever displayed in St. Peter's Square in Rome. And instead of just chucking it into the wood chipper, the Vatican will use the wood from 120-year-old tree to make toys for poor children; Reuters reports.
  • The U.S. is now growing a lot of maize for biofuels. But experts insist the lack of crop-diversity is messing with bug populations. Meaning there are less insects to eat pests that harm crops. Maize fields attract fewer ladybugs to eat the aphids that damage soybeans; NewScientist explains.
  • We all assume temperatures are constantly on the rise, but according to a new report, 2008 was actually the 10th warmest year since 1850. But, without humans mucking up the climate we would have been 50% less likely to see a year as warm as 2008; The New York Times investigates.
  • Despite their bad reputation, Cuba is a leader in the “eat local” movement. When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, Cuba planted thousands of local gardens to make up for the lack of imported food, setting up urban gardens next to parking lots and even on city rooftops; via ENN.

Green-News: Tuesday 12.8.08

  • Experts worry that converting food crops into fuel crops will inflate world food prices. So now biologists recommend converting saltwater plants into worry-free biomass. This would also open up large expanses of land not previously suitable for agriculture; Wired Science reports.
  • The term “clean coal” is all the rage. But an environmental group, backed by Al Gore, is launching a campaign against clean coal, claiming there is no such thing as clean coal and no coal-burning plant in the U.S. captures its global warming pollution; The Washington Post investigates.