Company Who Recalled Bad Beef Was Warned Before!

Last week, a meat processor recalled over 800,000 pounds of beef due to salmonella. And now, a new report accuses the company of dragging unconscious cattle, which can raise cows' risk of contracting E. coli and salmonella.

Records show the company was also slapped with an animal handling citation last year after US Department of Agriculture (USDA) inspectors found workers at the Fresno plant were using electric prods to cajole cattle through a narrow chute prior to slaughter. The visit, carried out in March 2008, followed in the wake of the biggest beef recall in US history that was linked to a separate Californian slaughter facility.

The company, a subsidiary of Cargill, was admonished after three cows were stunned when they refused to move “so that they could be pulled through the restrainer to be shackled, hung and bled," said the USDA report.

Under USDA regulations, use of a cattle prod is considered humane when used properly on walking animals. It is understood that dragging unconscious cattle could increase the risk of animals contracting salmonella and E.coli as cow hides can pick up bacteria from feces than can collect around the chute.

This shouldn’t surprise you. Food producers cut corners all the time. That peanut butter scare in January, turns out the guilty company had been scolded for mildew before the recall.

Via Food Production Daily.

Image credit: jcarwash1

Recalled Ground Beef Linked to Antibiotic-Resistant Salmonella

Aren’t you glad you don’t eat hamburgers? Yesterday, US Department of Agriculture issued a warning that more than 800,000 pounds of beef products from a California producer have been recalled due to an outbreak of antibiotic-resistant salmonella.

The US authorities said it had raised the alarm after being contacted by Colorado health officials about an ongoing investigation into an outbreak of Salmonella Newport.

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) announced last week that it was involved in a nationwide investigation with the USDA and other state authorities to investigate cases of salmonella infections that were “resistant to several commonly used antibiotics”.

While reports of illnesses have come from nine states, the majority of those affected were in Colorado – with ground beef pin-pointed as the most likely cause for the 21 people sickened in the state, said the CDPHE.

Whoa! That’s a pretty big recall. The last big one was the 400,000 pounds recalled for E. coli contamination. I wonder what they do with it all. Maybe that's how you make hotdogs.

Via Food Production Daily.

Image credit: bluemoose

Hotel Room from Hell...

Some call it a masterpiece. I call it a nightmare. In 1999, an artist sprayed an entire room at the Washington Jefferson Hotel in New York City with melted cheese, in the name of art:

 

 

Yeah, maybe creative freedom isn’t such a good idea. Because you end up with things like this. The hot beef sundae—ground beef, gravy and buttered toast, topped with cheddar. Eek!

Via Serious Eats.

Image credit: diagonaluk

Over 400,000 Pounds of Beef Recalled...

Evil E. coli is at it again! On Sunday, a Colorado meat company expanded it’s voluntarily recall of beef believed to be contaminated with E. coli, bringing the total from 380,000 pounds of meat to 421,000 pounds. The bad meat was distributed internationally and is suspected in 18 cases of illness. Currently, the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are conducting an investigation; Reuters reports.

Just add beef to the pile. Last week, Nestlé Toll House recalled cookie dough tainted with E. coli, sickening 66 people in 28 states. E. coli is no joke. It can be fatal. Common symptoms of E. coli poisoning include urinary tract infection, diarrhea and bowel inflammation. Eek!

And don’t forget. In 2006, a spinach-E. coli crisis dragged on for months, causing some people to ditch large factory farms and explore locally grown fruits and vegetables.

Image credit: Penny and Simon