Heart Disease Starts Before a Heart Attack

New findings in the International Journal of Clinical Practice reveal the symptoms of cardiovascular disease prior to a heart attack go largely undiagnosed. Of the 1,573 heart patients surveyed, over 50% claimed their ailment was not identified until they started showing symptoms, such as chest pain and shortness of breath or an actual heart attack, with 22% saying they were diagnosed while being treated for something else; via Booster Shots.

Listen, heart disease doesn’t just happen. In fact, in Dr. Fuhrman’s book Disease-Proof Your Child, he explains precursors to cardiovascular, like high cholesterol, start in childhood and lead to heart disease in adulthood, but the problem is, young people don’t take heart health seriously.

In related news, a recent report found people with poor cardiovascular fitness have a 56% higher risk of heart attack and eating red meat is linked to a 27% higher risk of heart disease.

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Lose Weight, Stop Sleep Apnea

A low-calorie diet and exercise may help cure sleep apnea. Reported in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, researchers examined 81 patients with mild sleep apnea, 40 participants were given a low-calorie diet and lifestyle counseling, losing an average of 20 pounds in a year and reducing symptoms of sleep apnea. But the remaining 41 people only received counseling and lost an average of 6 pounds and were unlikely to improve in their sleep apnea; via EurekAlert!

Actually, a previous study showed people eating diets high in cholesterol and artery-clogging saturated fat were at heightened risk of developing severe symptoms of sleep apnea, but many doctors still don’t give their obese patients diet plans. Other dangers of obesity include type-2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, cancer, fatty liver disease and increased overall mortality.

In related news, this November a 32-year long study revealed children consistently getting enough sleep were less likely to become obese as adults.

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Obesity Risk: Family Lifestyle Equal to Genes

New research in the American Journal of Sociology claims to be the first study to illustrate that the link between parents and children’s bodyweight is social as well as genetic. Scientists determined parents’ weight did contribute to a child’s likelihood of becoming obese, but lifestyle choices, like physical activity and meals, also played an important role, specifically in teens; Reuters investigates.

Actually, I think Dr. Fuhrman beat these guys to the punch. “Setting an example supported by both parents is the most important and most effective way for your children to develop a healthy attitude toward food,” he explains. Not mention, a previous report shows when families reconnect at mealtime, children become more likely to eating healthy as adults and less likely to pick up bad habits.