Exercise Improves Quality of Life After Cancer

A good half hour in the gym is a great way to blow off some steam and according to a new study in the journal Cancer, exercise also helps improve life after cancer, specifically breast, prostate and colorectal cancer.

They interviewed 753 men and women, all at least 65 years old, who had survived 5 or more years after a breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer diagnosis. All were overweight to some degree, but none was morbidly obese.

When the interviewers asked about exercise, diet, weight status, and quality of life, they found that half the group got no more than 10 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous exercise per week, and only 7% had healthful eating habits…

…However, those who exercised more and had better diet quality also had better physical quality of life outcomes (e.g., better vitality and physical functioning) than those who exercised less and ate poorly. Also, the greater the body weight, the poorer the physical quality of life.

In general, conclude [researchers], the results point to "the potential negative impact of obesity and the positive impact of physical activity and a healthy diet on physical quality of life in cancer survivors.

In related news, doing moderate to high-intensity exercise for 30 minutes a day cuts cancer risk in men by 50%. Regular exercise helps strengthen bones too.

Via Reuters.

Image credit: Locator

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Alicia - August 6, 2009 9:33 AM

I have been reading a lot about cancer lately. There are many doctors that recommend mild to moderate daily exercise to improve outcomes when going through cancer treatments. Of course, daily exercise and proper nutrition are also thought to help the body fight DNA mutations before they become cancer.

I only wish this information had been more widely broadcast 30 years ago when my husband and I were forming habits so we could have been preventing cancer rather than treating cancer now.

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