Cancer: Get Up, Get Moving!

I think cancer shocks most people, but if you examine the root cause of the disease, it’s not all that surprising. Dr. Fuhrman explains:
The bottom line is if you eat the Standard American Diet or something close to it, you most likely will develop the same diseases—heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, dementia, and cancer—that most Americans get. You cannot escape from the biological law of cause and effect. If you eat the diet most Americans eat, you will get the diseases most Americans get.
Now, let’s say you had cancer and were fortunate enough to survive it. You’d whip yourself into shape—right? Apparently not, because new research claims many cancer survivors are overweight and sedentary. HealthDay News reports:

 
General population statistics for Canada find that 37 percent of people are overweight, and 22 percent are obese, according to background information in the study. 


Fewer than 22 percent of cancer survivors reported being physically active. The lowest rates of physical activity were found among colorectal cancer survivors, breast cancer survivors and female survivors of melanoma.

Thirty-four percent of cancer survivors were overweight, and almost one in five was obese.

Obese breast cancer survivors were only about half as likely to be physically active as obese women who hadn't had cancer, a finding that's particularly worrisome, because poor outcomes in breast cancer have been associated with obesity and the often accompanying sedentary lifestyle.
Crazy, seems illogical, especially when you consider that exercise may combat the fatigue associated with cancer. More from HealthDay News:
"A lot of time, the medical response to patients is that they should expect to be fatigued, that it is a normal side effect. If patients are told that fatigue is just a side effect and to accept it, what they are not getting is any advice or support to help them cope," review lead author Fiona Camp, a lecturer at the University of the West of England in Bristol, said in a prepared statement.


Camp and her colleagues examined data on more than 2,000 cancer patients in 28 studies, which tested exercise programs that lasted from three weeks to eight months. The typical duration was 12 weeks. Walking and stationary bike riding were the most common types of exercise in the studies.

The researchers found that exercise is more effective at combating cancer-related fatigue than the usual care provided to patients.
Honestly, I can’t imagine recovering from something like cancer and NOT changing your life around.
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