How can you turn Halloween into a fun-filled time for your children while keeping it not too frightening for you

My kids always look forward to Halloween, even though they don't eat the candy (at least in front of me). They look forward to dressing up in costumes, being out with their friends, and staying up late on a school night. I, on the other hand, do not look forward to Halloween. I don't like the focus on promoting fear of ugly-looking creatures and giving toxic items to children. I don't call the candy “treats” because that gives children the wrong message. Think about it, calling something a “treat” encourages your children to look forward to receiving the “treat”. Do you really want to encourage your children to look forward to eating something that could be as harmful as cigarettes?
Jack O'lantern Flickr: wwarby
With our growing obesity epidemic, the increase in diabetes and strokes in children, and the scientific link between junk food and depression, decreased intellect, criminal behavior, dementia, and cancer, it is time mothers took a stand against the traditional Halloween junk food-fest.

The sad fact is that even normally well-behaved children can start acting crazy after consuming all the highly-sugared, chemicalized junk they get. And the disrupting behavior can last for as long as a month afterward. Yet, I'm not a person who believes in letting eating choices turn my home into a war zone. I believe in providing an education in healthful eating—and setting a good example! I keep unhealthful foods out of the house, and trust my kids to use their best judgment. Thankfully, we have figured out how to make Halloween a happy time for all of us, without joining the candy craze. Here are some tips that have worked for us.

1. Hand out inexpensive toys instead of candy. By setting this good example, perhaps a neighbor will pick up on the idea. Even if nobody follows your lead, you will feel good about your decision. Toys are perhaps a little more expensive than candy, but not much, and they definitely send a great message to both the kids and the parents.

My children help choose what they think is cool. In recent years, we have been giving out glow-in-the-dark necklaces and bracelets. The best thing about these toys is that they make kids safer in the dark because cars can see them when they are walking in the road. Kids say, “Wow!” or “Cool!” when they see the glowing gifts, so I know they love them. Plus, my kids are proud to hand them out. Now that my kids are older, they always remind me when it’s time to place my order. Other toys that we have purchased include blow up balloon balls, glow-in-the-dark animals, and glow-in-the-dark balls.

2. Make your family's favorite dinner on Halloween night, including their favorite desserts. There are great healthy fall menu ideas in the Member Center recipe guide. With full stomachs, your kids will be less tempted to eat the junk they receive. You also can try the Halloween treat recipes in the September 2006 Healthy Times Newsletter, or have some delicious Pop'ems and NEW Date-Nut Bars on hand from DrFuhrman.com.

3. When the children come home, if they are adamant about wanting to eat the candy, set a limit on how many candies they are allowed to eat. I suggest you allow them two pieces of candy, which they can pick out—and then discard the rest. In the past, we let our children pick one or two candies to eat, but in the more recent years they don’t even want any of it. They are too well informed now. Last Halloween, much to my surprise (I was brought up conventionally, so it’s amazing to watch Nutritarian children grow up) our children played with the candy. They opened the wrappers, and exclaimed how it didn’t look like food and then molded it.

4. Try to get your kids to choose not to eat the candy by making another option more tantalizing. For instance, give them money or a toy in exchange for their bag of candy.

5. Some people find it easiest to throw out all the candy after the children go to sleep. Little ones probably won't even remember it once it's gone, and getting rid of it eliminates temptation for the adults in the house. However, it is better to do this as a family and not secretively so the children understand the reason that it should be destroyed. It would be no different if the neighbors were being neighborly serving cigarettes or addictive drugs. Some socially accepted and popular customs are simply ignorant and dangerous. Dietary ignorance is the number one cause of death in America and everyone needs to know it.

6. Life is full of compromises— and this day will pass! I believe that with a little advance planning you can ensure that your children will have a fun time. Plus they will not be tempted to hide or sneak candy. I am certain you will be happier knowing that they will be eating a lot less candy this year than they did last year.

 

Image credit - Flickr: wwarby

Dr. Fuhrman has a "growing" presence in Africa

Something powerful, inspiring and incredibly heartwarming is happening in some of the poorest regions in Africa thanks to an organization called Organics4Orphans. There are people who can be considered true angels and Dale Bolton is among the these admirable people.  He is the founder of Organics4Orphans, an organization which brings Dr. Fuhrman’s nutrient-rich diet to orphaned children in Kenya, Ethiopia, Zambia, Uganda and Nigeria.  Not only are these children no longer starving or malnourished, thanks to Bolton’s team at Organics4Orphans, but they are learning what to eat to thrive. Given that there is a staggering 30 and 40 million orphaned children in Africa as a result of the AIDS/HIV epidemic, the implementation of this project as widely as possible is a goal Bolton and his team know is well worth achieving.

Organics4Orphans

As it stands, infectious diseases account for almost 70% of deaths in Africa and mortality rates from chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, respiratory disease and diabetes are accelerating at a rate never before seen in the developing world.  African health care systems are weak and ill equipped to handle this new wave of chronic disease sufferers. Given severe economic limits in healthcare, priorities remain linked to treating infectious and parasitic diseases rather than chronic, diet-related diseases. This is one reason why the work of Organic4Orphans is so critical; the team is quite literally saving the lives of children whom might otherwise develop a chronic disease for which medical care would not be available.   Dr. Fuhrman’s work is focused on preventing diseases such as infections, heart disease and cancer with superior nutrition, and avoiding needless medical care and medical interventions.    

This is no small feat and you might be wondering how some of the poorest countries in the world are able to access an array of healthful fruits and vegetables to feed all of these children so healthfully. However, it is entirely possible! This is how it works: Organics4Orphans employs a $500 a year budget for each village it sponsors and uses these funds to buy all the tools, seed, and fencing required for organic agriculture.  Employees and volunteers teach mothers and orphans how to make their own fertilizers, use natural pesticides and how to save their own seeds.  Most of the projects involve a dozen mothers who look after and teach 50-100 children why it is essential to learn how to grow and eat healthy, nutritious foods.  The result? Each child can flourish on a healthy diet for no more than $10 per child per year.

As Bolton has stated, “The amazing thing is that this type of organic growing is really designed for Africa and can even be cultivated in semi-arid areas.” In addition to learning how to farm and grow their own gardens, the mothers and children in the program are taught why it is necessary for them to consume a variety of nutrient-rich foods.  This is where Dr. Fuhrman comes into play. Dr. Fuhrman’s nutrient density charts are quite a boon as they are a visual aid to show mothers and the children they look after that they simply cannot live off of cornmeal without developing significant nutrient deficiencies and how to design the healthiest diet possible.  As cornmeal addiction is a real problem amongst many Africans, there is much to be gained from teaching them that they need to eat a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables.  Dr. Fuhrman’s charts do a superb job of showing them just this and they study his teachings, and implement a balanced and highly nutritious diet-style

Those who work on Bolton’s team are called Organic Agri-Nutritional Trainers or OATs.  Beginning this April, Bolton will implement a twelve-week training program for OATs volunteers.  Dr. Fuhrman’s books are employed for classroom nutrition training.  Bolton’s goal is to reach the world’s 50 poorest countries and to spread the concept by educating locals in different countries who can pass on what they’ve learned.  He’s explained that after funding each community for four years, they are able to grow enough food to not only feed themselves, but also cultivate enough food to sell.  Bolton remembers one woman in her fifties who, after eight months of training, was able to produce enough food to feed her five grandchildren and a handful of others.  She was even able to afford her own mattress for the first time in her life.  Now if that isn’t empowering, I don’t know what is.

For more information on Organics4Orphans and ways to get involved please visit: www.Organics4Orphans.org.    

Fight Breast Cancer with G-BOMBS

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month; this October, what women need to be aware of is that they are not powerless against breast cancer.  Mammograms for ‘early detection’ are not the only defense and do not even offer significant benefits. The scientific evidence shows that women do have the power to protect themselves against breast cancer with powerful preventive lifestyle measures. Staying slim and active, focusing on healthful natural foods, and avoiding the disease-causing foods of the Standard American diet are strategies women can use to win the war on breast cancer.

Most importantly, we must unleash the immune system’s special forces: G-BOMBS!

Mushrooms. Flickr: Building Blocks Show.

As I describe in my book Super Immunity, G-BOMBS (Greens, Beans, Onions, Mushrooms, Berries and Seeds) are the foods with the most powerful immune-boosting and anti-cancer effects.  These foods help to prevent the cancerous transformation of normal cells, and keep the body armed and ready to attack any pre-cancerous or cancerous cells that may arise.

 G – Greens

Green vegetables (the cruciferous family in particular) contain compounds with anti-cancer compounds and substances that protect blood vessels; they also promote healthy vision and reduce diabetes risk.1-3 Cruciferous vegetable phytochemicals inhibit a wide range of cancer-promoting cellular processes, including angiogenesis; the angiogenesis inhibitors found in in cruciferous vegetables prevent new blood vessel growth, which is needed for tumor growth and fat tissue growth.4-7 Eating cruciferous vegetables regularly is associated with decreased risk of breast cancer and has even been shown to increase survival in women after being diagnosed with breast cancer. 

B - Beans

Beans are unique foods because of their very high levels of fiber and resistant starch; carbohydrates that are not broken down by digestive enzymes. The fiber and resistant starch in beans reduce total the number of calories absorbed from beans,8,9 reduce cholesterol levels, and are converted by healthy gut bacteria into many substances that protect against colon cancer. Eating fiber-rich beans regularly dramatically lowers colon cancer risk, and a recent analysis of 10 scientific studies has shown that the higher your fiber intake, the lower your risk of breast cancer.10-15

O – Onions

Onions, leeks, garlic, shallots, chives, and scallions not only lend great flavor to meals, they have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular and immune systems, as well as anti-diabetic and anti-cancer effects.16-19  These vegetables are known for their characteristic (and eye-irritating) organosulfur compounds, which slow tumor growth and kill cancer cells – eating onions and garlic frequently is associated with reduced risk of digestive cancers.20,21  These vegetables also  contain high concentrations of anti-inflammatory flavonoid antioxidants that contribute to their anti-cancer properties.16,22-24

M - Mushrooms

In one recent Chinese study, women who ate at least 10 grams of fresh mushrooms each day (which equates to about one button mushroom per day) had a 64% decreased risk of breast cancer!25 All types of mushrooms all have anti-cancer properties.26-32 Plus, mushrooms are unique in that they contain aromatase inhibitors – compounds that can block the production of estrogen. Aromatase inhibitors are thought to be largely responsible for the preventive effects of mushrooms against breast cancer. Even the most commonly eaten mushrooms (white, cremini, and Portobello) have high anti-aromatase activity.25,33,34  Mushrooms also contain powerful angiogenesis inhibitors.31,35,36 Keep in mind that mushrooms should only be eaten cooked:  several raw culinary mushrooms contain a potentially carcinogenic substance called agaritine, and cooking mushrooms significantly reduces their agaritine content.37,38

B – Berries (and Pomegranate)

Berries’ plentiful antioxidant content helps to reduce blood pressure and inflammation, prevent DNA damage that leads to cancer, protect the brain against oxidative damage and stimulate the body’s own antioxidant enzymes.39-44  Berries and pomegranate are anti-angiogenic foods, and have anti-inflammatory effects that may protect against cancer and other chronic diseases.45-51 Pomegranate (similar to mushrooms) is one of the few foods that contain natural aromatase inhibitors – substances that inhibit the production of estrogen, which can reduce breast cancer risk.52

S - Seeds 

Nuts and seeds are healthy fat sources that increase the absorption of nutrients in vegetables in addition to supplying their own spectrum of micronutrients including plant sterols (which help to reduce cholesterol), minerals, and antioxidants. Some seeds – sesame and flax in particular – are rich in lignans, plant estrogens that protect against breast cancer; in one fascinating study, women were given flaxseeds daily after being diagnosed with breast cancer, and reduced growth and increased death of their tumor cells was found after just 4-5 weeks.53

Instead of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, make it Breast Cancer Prevention Month! Eat your G-BOMBS every day!

 

 

Image credit: Building Blocks Show (Flickr)

References:

1. Carter P, Gray LJ, Troughton J, et al. Fruit and vegetable intake and incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ 2010;341:c4229.
2. Higdon J, Delage B, Williams D, et al. Cruciferous vegetables and human cancer risk: epidemiologic evidence and mechanistic basis. Pharmacol Res 2007;55:224-236.
3. Stringham JM, Bovier ER, Wong JC, et al. The influence of dietary lutein and zeaxanthin on visual performance. J Food Sci 2010;75:R24-29.
4. Cavell BE, Syed Alwi SS, Donlevy A, et al. Anti-angiogenic effects of dietary isothiocyanates: mechanisms of action and implications for human health. Biochem Pharmacol 2011;81:327-336.
5. Kunimasa K, Kobayashi T, Kaji K, et al. Antiangiogenic effects of indole-3-carbinol and 3,3'-diindolylmethane are associated with their differential regulation of ERK1/2 and Akt in tube-forming HUVEC. The Journal of nutrition 2010;140:1-6.
6. Davis R, Singh KP, Kurzrock R, et al. Sulforaphane inhibits angiogenesis through activation of FOXO transcription factors. Oncol Rep 2009;22:1473-1478.
7. Kumar A, D'Souza SS, Tickoo S, et al. Antiangiogenic and proapoptotic activities of allyl isothiocyanate inhibit ascites tumor growth in vivo. Integrative cancer therapies 2009;8:75-87.
8. Bednar GE, Patil AR, Murray SM, et al. Starch and fiber fractions in selected food and feed ingredients affect their small intestinal digestibility and fermentability and their large bowel fermentability in vitro in a canine model. J Nutr 2001;131:276-286.
9. Muir JG, O'Dea K. Measurement of resistant starch: factors affecting the amount of starch escaping digestion in vitro. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;56:123-127.
10. Hamer HM, Jonkers D, Venema K, et al. Review article: the role of butyrate on colonic function. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2008;27:104-119.
11. O'Keefe SJ, Ou J, Aufreiter S, et al. Products of the colonic microbiota mediate the effects of diet on colon cancer risk. J Nutr 2009;139:2044-2048.
12. Bazzano LA, Thompson AM, Tees MT, et al. Non-soy legume consumption lowers cholesterol levels: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases : NMCD 2011;21:94-103.
13. Aune D, De Stefani E, Ronco A, et al. Legume intake and the risk of cancer: a multisite case-control study in Uruguay. Cancer Causes Control 2009;20:1605-1615.
14. Singh PN, Fraser GE. Dietary risk factors for colon cancer in a low-risk population. Am J Epidemiol 1998;148:761-774.
15. Dong JY, He K, Wang P, et al. Dietary fiber intake and risk of breast cancer: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Am J Clin Nutr 2011.
16. Powolny A, Singh S. Multitargeted prevention and therapy of cancer by diallyl trisulfide and related Allium vegetable-derived organosulfur compounds. Cancer Lett 2008;269:305-314.
17. Ginter E, Simko V. Garlic (Allium sativum L.) and cardiovascular diseases. Bratisl Lek Listy 2010;111:452-456.
18. Taj Eldin IM, Ahmed EM, Elwahab HMA. Preliminary Study of the Clinical Hypoglycemic Effects of Allium cepa (Red Onion) in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetic Patients. Environ Health Insights 2010;4:71-77.
19. Galeone C, Pelucchi C, Levi F, et al. Onion and garlic use and human cancer. The American journal of clinical nutrition 2006;84:1027-1032.
20. Zhou Y, Zhuang W, Hu W, et al. Consumption of large amounts of Allium vegetables reduces risk for gastric cancer in a meta-analysis. Gastroenterology 2011;141:80-89.
21. Pierini R, Gee JM, Belshaw NJ, et al. Flavonoids and intestinal cancers. Br J Nutr 2008;99 E Suppl 1:ES53-59.
22. Slimestad R, Fossen T, Vagen IM. Onions: a source of unique dietary flavonoids. J Agric Food Chem 2007;55:10067-10080.
23. Miyamoto S, Yasui Y, Ohigashi H, et al. Dietary flavonoids suppress azoxymethane-induced colonic preneoplastic lesions in male C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice. Chem Biol Interact 2010;183:276-283.
24. Shan BE, Wang MX, Li RQ. Quercetin inhibit human SW480 colon cancer growth in association with inhibition of cyclin D1 and survivin expression through Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway. Cancer Invest 2009;27:604-612.
25. Zhang M, Huang J, Xie X, et al. Dietary intakes of mushrooms and green tea combine to reduce the risk of breast cancer in Chinese women. Int J Cancer 2009;124:1404-1408.
26. Martin KR, Brophy SK. Commonly consumed and specialty dietary mushrooms reduce cellular proliferation in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Exp Biol Med 2010;235:1306-1314.
27. Fang N, Li Q, Yu S, et al. Inhibition of growth and induction of apoptosis in human cancer cell lines by an ethyl acetate fraction from shiitake mushrooms. J Altern Complement Med 2006;12:125-132.
28. Ng ML, Yap AT. Inhibition of human colon carcinoma development by lentinan from shiitake mushrooms (Lentinus edodes). J Altern Complement Med 2002;8:581-589.
29. Adams LS, Phung S, Wu X, et al. White button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) exhibits antiproliferative and proapoptotic properties and inhibits prostate tumor growth in athymic mice. Nutr Cancer 2008;60:744-756.
30. Lakshmi B, Ajith TA, Sheena N, et al. Antiperoxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antimutagenic activities of ethanol extract of the mycelium of Ganoderma lucidum occurring in South India. Teratog Carcinog Mutagen 2003;Suppl 1:85-97.
31. Cao QZ, Lin ZB. Antitumor and anti-angiogenic activity of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides peptide. Acta pharmacologica Sinica 2004;25:833-838.
32. Lin ZB, Zhang HN. Anti-tumor and immunoregulatory activities of Ganoderma lucidum and its possible mechanisms. Acta pharmacologica Sinica 2004;25:1387-1395.
33. Hong SA, Kim K, Nam SJ, et al. A case-control study on the dietary intake of mushrooms and breast cancer risk among Korean women. Int J Cancer 2008;122:919-923.
34. Shin A, Kim J, Lim SY, et al. Dietary mushroom intake and the risk of breast cancer based on hormone receptor status. Nutr Cancer 2010;62:476-483.
35. Lee JS, Park BC, Ko YJ, et al. Grifola frondosa (maitake mushroom) water extract inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor-induced angiogenesis through inhibition of reactive oxygen species and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation. J Med Food 2008;11:643-651.
36. Chang HH, Hsieh KY, Yeh CH, et al. Oral administration of an Enoki mushroom protein FVE activates innate and adaptive immunity and induces anti-tumor activity against murine hepatocellular carcinoma. International immunopharmacology 2010;10:239-246.
37. Toth B, Erickson J. Cancer induction in mice by feeding of the uncooked cultivated mushroom of commerce Agaricus bisporus. Cancer Res 1986;46:4007-4011.
38. Schulzova V, Hajslova J, Peroutka R, et al. Influence of storage and household processing on the agaritine content of the cultivated Agaricus mushroom. Food Addit Contam 2002;19:853-862.
39. Stoner GD, Wang LS, Casto BC. Laboratory and clinical studies of cancer chemoprevention by antioxidants in berries. Carcinogenesis 2008;29:1665-1674.
40. Bazzano LA, Li TY, Joshipura KJ, et al. Intake of Fruit, Vegetables, and Fruit Juices and Risk of Diabetes in Women. Diabetes Care 2008;31:1311-1317.
41. Hannum SM. Potential impact of strawberries on human health: a review of the science. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 2004;44:1-17.
42. Joseph JA, Shukitt-Hale B, Willis LM. Grape juice, berries, and walnuts affect brain aging and behavior. J Nutr 2009;139:1813S-1817S.
43. Cassidy A, O'Reilly EJ, Kay C, et al. Habitual intake of flavonoid subclasses and incident hypertension in adults. The American journal of clinical nutrition 2011;93:338-347.
44. Devore EE, Kang JH, Breteler MM, et al. Dietary intakes of berries and flavonoids in relation to cognitive decline. Ann Neurol 2012.
45. Roy S, Khanna S, Alessio HM, et al. Anti-angiogenic property of edible berries. Free Radic Res 2002;36:1023-1031.
46. Khan N, Afaq F, Kweon MH, et al. Oral consumption of pomegranate fruit extract inhibits growth and progression of primary lung tumors in mice. Cancer Res 2007;67:3475-3482.
47. Toi M, Bando H, Ramachandran C, et al. Preliminary studies on the anti-angiogenic potential of pomegranate fractions in vitro and in vivo. Angiogenesis 2003;6:121-128.
48. Sartippour MR, Seeram NP, Rao JY, et al. Ellagitannin-rich pomegranate extract inhibits angiogenesis in prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo. Int J Oncol 2008;32:475-480.
49. Panchal SK, Ward L, Brown L. Ellagic acid attenuates high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats. Eur J Nutr 2012.
50. Edirisinghe I, Banaszewski K, Cappozzo J, et al. Strawberry anthocyanin and its association with postprandial inflammation and insulin. Br J Nutr 2011;106:913-922.
51. Adams LS, Seeram NP, Aggarwal BB, et al. Pomegranate juice, total pomegranate ellagitannins, and punicalagin suppress inflammatory cell signaling in colon cancer cells. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemis ry 2006;54:980-985.
52. Adams LS, Zhang Y, Seeram NP, et al. Pomegranate ellagitannin-derived compounds exhibit antiproliferative and antiaromatase activity in breast cancer cells in vitro. Cancer Prev Res (Phila) 2010;3:108-113.
53. Thompson LU, Chen JM, Li T, et al. Dietary flaxseed alters tumor biological markers in postmenopausal breast cancer. Clin Cancer Res 2005;11:3828-3835.

 

BPA: How To Avoid This Ubiquitous Chemical Menace

Bisphenol-A (BPA) is its name and disrupting the our hormone function is its game. We should all be aware of what BPA is, the health conditions it’s associated with and where it’s lurking in our environment because this chemical is dangerous and it is found in many of the products we use each and every day. 

Canned tomatoes. Flickr: p_a_hThe health problems linked to BPA are astounding.  A mounting body of research shows that BPA is an endocrine disruptor that mimics our hormones, therefore interrupting their normal functioning.  This is serious given how much our delicate hormone balance influences our health.  Disruption of hormone levels due to BPA have been linked to breast cancer1, prostate cancer2, cardiovascular disease3, diabetes4, obesity5, infertility6, birth defects7, miscarriages8, developmental disorders in children9, premature puberty in young girls10, severe attention deficit disorder11, cognitive and brain development problems, deformations of the body (like our limbs), sexual development problems12-14, and feminizing of males or masculine effects on females.15-17 It seems like a lovely substance, doesn’t it? No doubt the evil Queen from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs would have loved to douse that poisonous apple with a nice shiny layer of BPA.  She might have permanently poisoned Snow White if she had.

A new study even shows that BPA negatively affects not just those who eat and touch BPA laden items, but it also affects multiple generations of their children.18  This study, published by the journal Endocrinology, studied trans-generational effects of BPA on mice.  One group of mice was fed BPA laden food and another group was fed their regular diets. Behavior was monitored and so was the behavior of three subsequent generations. Genetic testing was also conducted on all of the animals.

Remarkably, the mice that were exposed to BPA in the womb were less social and more isolated than the other group, as was the case for their children and their children’s children.  These mice spent less time exploring, playing and engaging in friendly behavior with the other mice. This is not the normal behavior of mice and shows that BPA can influence brain activity for generations.  Notably and frighteningly, the BPA exposed mice were exposed to levels of BPA that humans would normally be exposed to via our diets. While mice behavior and human behavior are obviously not the same, mice are a good laboratory model for what could happen to humans. The researchers even likened the behavioral issues they found in the BPA-exposed mice to autistic children and children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

To make matters worse, the same study found that 90 percent of Americans have BPA in their blood. Forget watching a horror movie, all we need to do to get a good scare is learn about the health effects of BPA and its ubiquity in our environment. That is, if we do not educate ourselves on which materials contain it and don’t make efforts to avoid it. 

Thankfully, with a bit of education we can steer clear of BPA as easily as a graceful decline of a receipt or the simple renouncement of tin can usage. BPA is found in quite a few unsuspecting places, which is why doing one’s homework really pays off.  Your jaw just may drop when you learn how many places BPA can be found, but thankfully there are plenty of alternatives.  Education really is power and this has never been truer than in the case of the malicious, microscopic villain that is BPA.

So which products are likely to contain BPA?

  1. Receipts- these pieces of paper are coated with a BPA-based coating that rubs off onto our fingers and whatever else it comes in contact with.
  2. Canned food- cans are lined with an epoxy resin that’s made of BPA, so watch out for soups, canned tomato sauces, fruits and vegetables.  Glass jars, frozen foods and paper cartons are our best alternatives.  One exception: the company Eden Organics produces a line of canned beans that are BPA free. They use oleoresin, which is a natural mixture of an oil and a resin extracted from plants. The can maker, Ball Corporation, says that Eden is the only company to date that makes BPA free cans. More information on their cans is available on the Eden Organics website.
  3. Avoid contact with plastic- use glass appliances and storage containers rather than plastic tubs to store leftovers. Stainless steel containers are wonderful substitutes for plastic lunch bags and takeout clamshells.
  4. “BPA-free” plastics are not safe- a study in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives found that those plastics purported to be safer that those containing BPA were lined with BPA alternatives that could be  just as noxious.
  5. Dental sealants are a BPA warehouse- BPA is the most frequently used dental sealant material and it’s used in composite fillings used to treat cavities.  Dental treatments have been linked to social problems in children, leading a slew of pediatricians to advocate the use of other materials. However, this change has yet to manifest itself in safer dental care so our best bet is to brush regularly, floss and visit our dentists for regular cleanings.
  6. Alcoholic beverages- wine and beer are fermented in BPA-resin lined vats.  If you enjoy your fair share of alcoholic drinks, this may just be the motivation you need to eschew that glass of wine or beer. Your hormones will thank you.
  7. Infant formula and baby bottles- if you thought BPA in alcohol was sad, this one may be even sadder; I believe the worst is when helpless infants are exposed to BPA. We already knew breastfeeding was best for the little ones, but this news provides even more of an incentive to do so. If breastfeeding isn’t possible, glass bottles and un-canned, powdered formula is second best.
  8. Plastic utensils- alas, BPA is found in almost all plastics, plastic utensils included. Although not possible all the time, bring your own utensils when as much as you can.
  9. Aluminum soda cans- as if Coca Cola and Pepsi weren’t bad enough on their own, now we know they contain BPA as well as over the top amounts of high fructose corn syrup and artificial sweeteners.  Stay away, just stay away.
  10. It’s in your dollar bills- yup, BPA makes its residency on our money because the ink it’s printed on is pure BPA. Other than avoiding touching money, which is impossible for most, our best option is to wash our hands after we exchange the moolah.  

There you have it. While completely avoiding BPA is likely impossible, knowing which products contain BPA will help us greatly reduce our exposure.  Maybe you and I, and all those we share this article with, can make ourselves part of the ten percent of Americans with undetectable blood BPA levels and help that percentage grow. 

 

Image credit Flickr: p_a_h

References:

1. Lozada KW, Keri RA (2011). Bisphenol A Increases Mammary Cancer Risk in Two Distinct Mouse Models of Breast Cancer Running title: Bisphenol A and mouse mammary cancer risk. Biology of Reproduction Papers in Press. Published on June 2, 2011 as DOI:10.1095/biolreprod.110.090431.

2. Ho S. Tang W. Prins GS, et al.Developmental Exposure to Estradio and Bisphenol-A Increases Susceptibility to Prostate Carcinogenesis and Epigenetically Regulates Phosphodiesterase Type 4 Variant 4. J of Cancer Research.

3. Melzer D, Rice NE, Lewis C, et al. Association of Urinary Bisphenol A Concentration with Heart Disease: Evidence from NHANES 2003/06. PLOS ONE 2010; 5(1): e8673.

4. Lang, IA, Galloway TS, Scarlett A, et al. Association of Urinary Bisphenol A Concentration With Medical Disorders and Laboratory Abnormalities in Adults. JAMA 2008; 300(11):1303-1310.

5. Carwile JL, Michels KB. Urinary bisphenol A and obesity: NHANES 2003-2006. Environmental Research 2011; 111(6): 825-830.

6. Meeker JD, Ehrlich S, Toth TL, et al. Semen quality and sperm DNA damage in relation to urinary bisphenol A among men from an infertility clinic. Reproductive Toxicology 2010; 30(4): 532-539.

7. Brieno-Enriquez MA, Toran N, Martinez F, et al. Gene expression is altered after bisphenol A exposure in human fetal oocytes in vitro. Mol Hum Reprod 2012; 18(4): 171-183.

8. Sugiura-Ogasawara M, Ozaki Y, Sonta S, Makino T, Suzumori K. (2005). Exposure to bisphenol A is associated with recurrent miscarriage. Human Reprod, 20:2325-2429.

9. Friedrich MJ. Bisphenol A and Reproduction. JAMA 2011; 305(1): 28.

10. Howdeshell KL, Hotchkiss AK, Thayer KA, et al. Environmental toxins: Exposure to bisphenol A advances puberty. Nature 1999; 401: 763-764.

11. Behavioral characterization of rats exposed neonatally to bisphenol-A: responses to novel environment and to methylphenidate challenge in a putative model of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. J of Neural Trans 2008; 115(7): 1079-1085.

12. Nagel SC, Boechler M, WV Welshons, et al. Relative binding affinity-serum modified access (RBA-SMA) assay predicts the relative in vivo bioactivity of the xenoestrogens bisphenol A and octylphenol. Environ Health Perspect 1997; 105(1): 70-76.

13. Li D, Zhou Z, Qing Y, et al. (2009). Occupational exposure to bisphenol-A (BPA) and the risk of self-reported male sexual dysfunction. Human Reprod, doi:10.1093/humrep/dep381.

14. Lang IA, Galloway TS, Scarlett A, et al. Association of Urinary Bisphenol A Concentration With Medical Disorders and Laboratory Abnormalities in Adults. JAMA 2008; 300(11): 1303-1310.

15. Howdeshell KL. Andrew KH, Thayer KA, et al. Environmental toxins: Exposure to bisphenol A advances puberty. Nature 1999; 401: 763-764.

16. Braun JM, Yolton K, Dietrich KN, et al. (2009). Prenatal bisphenol A exposure and early childhood behavior. Environ Health Perspect, 117:1945-1952.

17. Lang IA, Galloway TS, Scarlett A, et al. (2008). Association of urinary bisphenol A concentration with medical disorders and laboratory abnormalities in adults. J Am Med Assoc, 300:1303-1310.

18. Edwards M, Gatewood JD, Wolstenholme JT, et al. Gestational Exposure to Bisphenol A Produces Transgenerational Changes in Behaviors and Gene Expression. Endocrinology 2012. Published online before print.